Aldeburgh Golf Club

GEO Certified® 02/2018
Aldeburgh,
England, United Kingdom
Telephone: 01728 454412
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The audit of Aldeburgh Golf Club was carried out on 29 January 2018, for the initial certification of the facility. Secretary David Wybar and course manager Mark Broughton were present, holding in-house discussions with both before walking the course and touring the maintenance facility with the course manager.

The golf course was opened in 1884 and during the early part of the twentieth century was remodeled in part by Willie Park, J H Taylor and Harry Colt. It has 27 Holes; the 18 hole Championship course, which measures 6603 yards off…

Keith Duff, GEOSA, Accredited Verifier Read verifier report.

GEO Certified® Report

GEO Certified® is the symbol of great golf environments worldwide – designating that a golf facility has met a credible standard in the areas of nature, water, energy, supply chain, pollution control, and community, and is committed to continually improve. GEO Certified® is widely trusted and endorsed by a growing number of organizations and people, both inside and outside golf.

Click below to read about the activities undertaken by this golf facility to operate sustainably.

Facility details

Golf Courses
18 Hole Course (18 holes, 6603 yards, year opened 1884)
River Course (9 holes, 2015 yards, year opened 1973)
1 Clubhouse(s)
3 Maintenance Facility/Facilities
1 Pro Shop
1 Practice Facility/Facilities

Nature

The courses are situated on lowland heath in the Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. On the main course there is dry acid grassland interspersed with gorse and other scrub with some heather. There is also around 20Ha of plantation woodland and 20Ha of grassland managed under ELS and HLS. To the East of the course we have the North Warren RSPB reserve and to the South West the Hazelwood marsh Suffolk Wildlife Trust reserve.

Consultation & Surveys

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding landscape heritage conservation:

  • Sports Turf Research Institute
  • Suffolk wildlife Trust

No landscape assessments or surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding ecosystem protection and enhancement:

  • STRI
  • FWAG

The following ecological surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Species survey Suffolk Wildlife Trust 2004/11/07

Rare, protected and notable species occurring at this golf facility:

Local name Scientific name
Turtle Dove Streptopelia turtur
Nightingale Luscinia megarhynchos
Linnet Carduelis cannabina
Yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella
Woodlark Lullula arboria
Skylark Alauda arvensis
Adder Vipera berus
Grass snake Natrix natrix

This golf facility regularly monitors the following species as indicators of environmental quality:

Local name Scientific name
Nightingale Luscinia megarhynchos
Woodlark Lullula arboria
Turtle Dove Streptopelia turtur

Habitats & Designations

This golf facility features the following landscape designations:

Description Designating Authority
Areas of Scenic Beauty National
County wildlife site Suffolk County Council

Area of habitats / vegetation types, and associated designations at this golf facility:

Title Estimated Area (Hectares) Designation
Rough 'ecological' grassland 35 Self Appointed
Scrub Vegetation 10 Self Appointed
Non Native Plantation Woodland 20 None
Open Water Features .5 None
Heather and other dwarf shrub communities .5 None

Turfgrass

Size and estimated species composition of amenity turfgrass maintained at this golf facility.

Estimated Area (Hectares) Turfgrass Species Sward Composition (%)
Greens 1.4 Hectares Festuca rubra 60%
Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 40%
Tees 0.8 Hectares Festuca rubra 60%
Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 40%
Fairways 25.0 Hectares Festuca rubra 70%
Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 30%
Semi Rough 20.0 Hectares Festuca rubra 60%
Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 40%

These turfgrasses are optimal for the circumstances at this club because:
We are situated in an area of low rainfall on sandy soil. The fine fescues and bent grasses allow us to operate a low input, sustainable maintenance regime.

This golf facility assesses mowing patterns every: 1 years

This golf facility consults the following individuals / organizations regarding its grassing plan:

  • Creative Golf Design (Ken Moodie)
  • STRI (Paul Woodham)

This golf facility is making the following efforts to manage the playing quality expectations of customers:

Activity Description
Establishing clear internal policies for irrigation, fertilization, colour, cutting heights, overseeding etc We have a detailed course management policy which sets out our objectives for a naturally presented golf course using fine grass species. It states how we intend to achieve our objectives through low input sustainable greenkeeping.
Promoting the playing quality values of more naturalized turf, particularly fairways and semi-rough The playing qualities of naturalized turf are promoted in the the course management policy and also in the course development plan which is updated annually. The course manager uses his blog and monthly newsletter to provide more topical information on sustainable and natural course management.
Promoting the financial benefits of presenting sustainable surfaces The financial benefits of maintaining the golf courses in a sustainable way are clearly stated in the course development plan.
Improving customer understanding around greens maintenance We aim to improve member and visitor understanding of course maintenance issues through notices, newsletters, open meetings, the course managers blog, our website and Twitter.
Demonstrating the direct relationship between environmental best practice and year round high quality playing surfaces These are stated clearly in our development plan

Conservation & Enhancement

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve landscape character:

Activity Description
Allowing seasonal variation of course coloration and texture We allow seasonal variation in the colour of mown areas of the course including allowing fairways to turn brown in drought conditions.
Appropriately matching mowing lines to contours We match mowing lines to contours, landscape features and vegetation to create a natural looking golf course
Protection and restoration of historic features There are some old field boundary riges that are preserved and many features of the main course are historic in that they have been in place since 1884.
Discreet on-course signage and furniture We have a policy to keep signs and furniture to the minimum and to keep those items we do have as unobtrusive as possible.
Conservation of specimen trees Trees of landscape and ecological value are preserved
Screening and softening unsightly man-made features Tree and hedge planting has been done (mainly on the boundaries of the course) to screen man made features.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the landscape ecology of the golf course:

Activity Description
Minimizing the amount of amenity grass Amenity grass maintenance is limited to the immediate playing area. A 5m strip of semi rough is cut around fairways but the areas beyond this are maintained as natural lowland heath with a mix of dry acid grassland and scrub.
Increasing the size of habitat patches We are increasing the amount of some habitat types within the heathland. Heather areas are being expanded and dry acid grassland is being developed where bracken dominated previously.
Connection of internal habitat patches Wherever possible internal habitat patches are connected to provide corridors for wildlife.
Connection of patches with external habitats The golf course provides a connection between the Hazelwood marsh Suffolk Wildlife Trust reserve and the North Warren RSPB reserve.
Creation of habitat corridors We have been working to connect up various habitat patches including linking rough grassland with the rough grass on fairway bunker banks
Avoidance of habitat fragmentation The course layout with large areas of heathland between holes minimizes habitat fragmentation.
Improving and diversifying habitat edges Over several years we have worked to break up large stands of gorse or create scalloped edges to increase the amount of edge habitat.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the quality of habitats on the golf course:

Activity Description
Creation of botanically rich rough grassland The main maintenance work on the rough grassland is occasional (usually annual) cutting and collecting to reduce nutrient availability and encourage species rich grassland. Bracken and scrub control keeps these invasive species in check.
Ecologically informed management of scrub vegetation There are large areas of scrub on the course and these are maintained in accordance with our scrub management plan. Much of the gorse is coppiced on a 10 to 12 year cycle and heather is cut back occasionally to maintain its vigour.
Promoting species and structurally diverse woodlands Our woodlands are maintained through selective thinning and coppicing, to favour British native species and create structural and age diversity.
Establishment of littoral shelves and marginal vegetation in wetland areas We have recently created on new pond and extended another. In both cases littoral shelves have been created and marginal vegetation encouraged.
Maintenance of an appropriate balance of open water and aquatic vegetation We have varied the depth of the ponds so that areas of open water are maintained.
Naturalization of linear habitats Wherever possible hedges are trimmed infrequently to maintain a natural appearance and provide an enhanced wildlife habitat.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve and enhance biodiversity on the golf course:

Activity Description
Provision of nesting and nectar for pollinators Our heathland and grassland management aims to produce species rich grassland and a mosaic of gorse and heather. Insect hotels have been created.
Installation of nest boxes There are several owl boxes on the course and various nest boxes for smaller birds.
Provision of feeding tables There is a feeding station in the woodland near the maintenance building.
Control / management of alien species Seedlings of invasive tree species are removed annually and non native species are controlled.
Provision of hibernation areas Some areas of scrub are left undisturbed.
Creation of micro-habitats (eg log and stone piles) Log and brash piles are created as part of the woodland management programme
Bare ground areas are created as part of the heathland management work.

Water

Water for the clubhouse comes from a mains supply. For the course we have three supplies, a seepage pond, a well on the course and a supply from the old Aldeburgh town well. The Aldeburgh town well is our main supply for course irrigation this well was out of use for many years as it became non-potable until we came to an agreement with Essex and Suffolk water to use it for irrigation.

Sources & Consumption

The following water audits have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Irrigation water audit M Broughton 2016/09/10

The water used at this golf facility is drawn from the following sources:

2016 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 764,000 Litres
Golf Course Groundwater 100% 16,838,000 Litres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 0 Litres
Other Public / Potable 0 Litres
2015 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 764,000 Litres
Golf Course Groundwater 100% 24,428,000 Litres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 0 Litres
Other Public / Potable 0 Litres
2014 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 879,000 Litres
Golf Course Groundwater 100% 18,945,000 Litres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 0 Litres
Other Public / Potable 0 Litres

Irrigation & Efficiency

The following areas receive irrigation at this golf facility:

Greens 2-3 days per week
Tees 2-3 days per week
Fairways Weekly
Other Weekly

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:
Fully computer controlled

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:

Serviced every 1 years

Upgraded every 1 years

Re-calibrated and checked for efficient application every 1 years

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to maximize irrigation efficiency:

Activity Description
Selection of grass species The courses are fescue dominated and our entire maintenance programme is based around encouraging fine fescue. Over the last few years regular over-seeding with fescue has been carried out on greens and other areas. New tees have been turfed with pure fescue.
Soil decompaction and thatch management Our soil is very well drained with minimal thatch on the greens. Regular aeration work is carried out and our low input management strategies keep thatch development to a minimum.
Timing and dose of water application Most irrigation is carried out overnight with some hand watering during the day. Our aim is to let the soil dry out to 10% moisture content or below and then irrigate to around 15% to 20%.
Analysis of soil moisture We use a Theta probe to monitor soil moisture levels and help us plan irrigation and we have a data logger monitoring soil moisture at 10cm and 20cm depth in one of the greens.
Incorporation of evapotranspiration rates and weather data We use a weather station to monitor rainfall and other weather variables.
Use of wetting agents Wetting agents are used on the greens and some other areas including weak parts of fairways.
Overall reduction in irrigated area As we are situated on sand in an area of low rainfall, all of the fine turf areas require irrigation for survival at time of drought. We adjust sprinkler arcs and positioning to reduce overthrow into areas of rough.
Targeting of sprinkler heads Careful sprinkler selection, positioning, arc adjustment and nozzle size helps us keep irrigation to targeted areas.
Optimizing system pressure The pump set, pipe work and control systems are optimized to keep pressures and flow rates within an efficient range
Adoption of cutting edge nozzle technology Our system is relatively modern and we use up to date sprinklers and control systems. As sprinklers are replaced through wear or breakage we replace them with the latest designs that are compatible with our system.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve / reduce / minimize water consumption:

Activity Description
Low-flow urinals and toilets Low flow urinals with sensors
Use of water efficient appliances efficient appliances in use
Use of efficient shower technology Modern showers
Repairing leaks Promptly repaired
Water awareness signage In place

Energy

Wherever possible we aim to keep energy use low and to obtain our resources from ethical and environmentally sound local suppliers.
Re - "Consumption of non-renewable energy and resources" (see below)- Please note the gas is in kWh and not litres.

Sources & Consumption

The following energy surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Energy & Green Procurement Report and Action Plan East Coast Carbon Efficiency (ECCE) 2013/06/20
Suffoll Carbon Charter Bronze Logo Suffolk County Council 2014/08/18
Aldeburgh Golf Club Renewable Energy Feasibility Review SABRE - Support and Advice to Businesses around Renewable Energy 2013/12/16

Consumption of renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2016 2015 2014
Biogas (Litres) 0 0 0
Biomass 0 0 0
First Generation Bio-Fuels (Litres) 0 0 0
Hydrogen (Litres) 0 0 0
On-site Hydro (kWh) 0 0 0
On-site Solar (kWh) 0 0 0
On-site Wind (kWh) 0 0 0
Renewable Grid Electricity (kWh) 0 0 0
Second Generation Bio-Fuels (Litres) 0 0 0
Wood from sustainable sources 0 0 0

Consumption of non-renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2016 2015 2014
Coal 0 0 0
Diesel (Litres) 7398 8856 1060
Heating Oil (Litres) 0 0 0
Hydraulic Oil (Litres) 60 60 60
LPG (Litres) 0 0 0
Natural Gas (Litres) 141782 130351 135438
Non-renewable Grid (kWh) 92644 97961 102950
Petrol (Litres) 1450 1347 1766
Propane / Butane (Litres) 974 0 1033
Wood from unsustainable sources 0 0 0

Energy Efficiency

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to diversify energy and fuel supply:

Activity Description
Adoption of green tariff grid supply None
Installation of small scale wind turbine None
Installation of photovoltaic and / or solar panels None
Use of geothermal and / or ground sources None
Use of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) LPG is used for heating and hot water in the green keeping accommodation block
Use of biodiesel and /or ethanol None
Use of electric hybrid vehicles None
Use of recycled oils The kitchen recycles its cooking oil.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to reduce energy consumption:

Activity Description
Investment in low-energy heating and air conditioning systems Efficient boiler installed May 2017. We do not have any air conditioning.
Optimizing thermostat levels for heating and refrigeration New A rated refrigerators installed on a rolling basis from Jan - Sept 2017.
Heating thermostatically controlled.
Installation of low-energy lighting The kitchen has all LED lighting. We are replacing all lights with LED lights and use LED light bulbs.
Use of motion sensor lighting Car Park and Pro Shop areas. Club House Men's toilets.
Transition to energy efficient appliances New boiler installed May 2017.
Use of timers with appliances, heating and lighting Heating
Educating staff and customers Staff are encouraged to turn off lights, computers and computer screens and any other equipment not in use.

Vehicles & Transport

The maintenance fleet at this golf facility uses the following fuel sources:

Ride-on Mowers Walking Mowers Utility Vehicles
Petrol 0% 100% 17%
Diesel 100% 0% 33%
LPG 0% 0% 0%
Grid Electric 0% 0% 50%
Micro Renewable 0% 0% 0%
Hybrid 0% 0% 0%
Hydrogen 0% 0% 0%

Additional vehicles operated by this golf facility use the following fuel sources:

Golf Carts Cars Buses
Petrol 0% 0% 0%
Diesel 0% 100% 0%
LPG 0% 0% 0%
Grid Electric 100% 0% 0%
Micro Renewable 0% 0% 0%
Hybrid 0% 0% 0%
Hydrogen 0% 0% 0%

This golf facility has established the following schemes to encourage reductions in staff and customer transport emissions:

Activity Description
Car sharing incentives None but some staff do car share
Group transportation (e.g. buses) None
Secure cycle parking None but several staff cycle to work
Increasing equipment storage (e.g. lockers) Equipment storage is adequate
Staff showers Showers are provided for staff
Tax breaking incentives for cycling None
Promotion of walk to work campaigns None

Supply Chain

We use a wide range of products and services ranging from golf course management products to catering supplies and office equipment. Wherever possible we obtain these products and services locally or regionally.

Purchasing Policies

This golf facility undertakes the following ethical / environmental purchasing activities:

Activity Description
Use of local suppliers Wherever possible we use local suppliers.
Use of local products Normally we use all local products - Such as the meat purchased by the kitchen. If not local this is always from the UK.
Selection of certified products Free range meat and eggs are bought.
Use of recycled and recyclable products Where possible we buy recycled stationery items - such as copy paper and sellotape.
Recycled paper and plastic cups used - 'Vegware'.
Selection of products that feature minimal packaging Wherever possible we use products which are not over packaged.
Use of accredited suppliers (e.g. ISO 14001) Copy paper - Image Antalis - ISO - 9001 & ISO 14001 & OHSAS 18001

Supply Chain

An overview of the supplier network at this golf facility:

Total number of suppliers Total number of suppliers within 10 Miles Total number of suppliers within 100 Miles
Food & Beverage 12 12
Catering Supplies 2 2
Retail 20 5
Trade & Contractors 10 5 5
Maintenance Equipment 6 2 6
Course Supplies 15 4 8

Turfgrass Inputs

This golf facility undertakes the following IPM activities:

Activity Description
Encouraging drought and disease tolerant grasses Our entire course management regime is centered around retaining and developing fine fescue/bent turf which requires low inputs of fertilizer and water.
Managing stress and wear Stress and wear is managed by controlling golf and maintenance vehicle traffic. In high traffic areas we use more robust and wear tolerant grasses. High stress management operations are kept to a minimum.
Enhancement of soil structure Regular aeration and top dressing work is carried out.
Optimization of the growing environment All of our turf management is aimed at providing the optimum growing environment for fine grasses.
Managing thatch levels The organic matter content of our greens is low (currently 7%) and our aim is to reduce this to 4% to 6%. We will do this by continuing our aeration work, keeping fertilizer and water inputs to a minimum and by regular top dressing.
Managing surface moisture We manage surface moisture by aerating regularly and removing dew early in the morning. Shade is reduced and air movement increased by controlling tree and scrub encroachment.
maximising air movement Aeration
Brushing reducing shade
Establishing thresholds for pests and disease Low levels of pest and disease activity are tolerated - chemical control is only used when absolutely necessary.
Scouting for pests and diseases Scouting for pests and diseases is carried out as part of the daily course check.
Monitoring / improvement of plant health We monitor plant health daily and adjust our maintenance programme to develop healthy turf.

Fertilizer use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2016 2015 2014
Fairways - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - K - Organic 0 0 0
Fairways - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - N - Organic 0 0 0
Fairways - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - P - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Greens - K - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - N - Inorganic 37.8 23.2 10.6
Greens - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Greens - P - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Tees - K - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - N - Inorganic 36 36 36
Tees - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Tees - P - Organic 0 0 0

Pesticide use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2016 2015 2014
Fairways - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Fairways - Herbicide - Active Ingredient .39 .39 .39
Fairways - Herbicide - Total Weight 2 2 2
Fairways - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Fairways - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Fairways - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Fairways - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Greens - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Greens - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Greens - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Active Ingredient .39 .39 .39
Greens - Herbicide - Total Weight 2 2 2
Greens - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Greens - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Greens - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Greens - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Herbicide - Active Ingredient .39 .39 .39
Tees - Herbicide - Total Weight 2 2 2
Tees - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Tees - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Tees - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Tees - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0

This golf facility undertakes the following actions to optimize pesticide use:

Activity Description
Selection on the least toxic and lest persistent products We choose the least toxic and persistent products that are effective for the pest or disease to be controled
Selection of appropriate products for specific pests and diseases On the infrequent occasions that we use pesticides we take care to select effective products appropriate for the specific pest or disease and the level of infestation.
Spot-treatment with handheld sprayers and wipers Spot treatment is carried out whenever appropriate and effective.
Calibration and testing of sprayers Sprayers are calibrated regularly and tested in accordance with regulations.
Use of shrouded sprayer and anti-drip nozzles Low drift nozzles are used
Non-chemical weed control Most ragwort control is carried out by hand pulling.
We use a tree popper for removing encroaching scrub and sapling trees.
Use of organic and biological products to improve plant health and resistance. Our entire course maintenance regime revolves around providing the optimum conditions under which fine grasses thrive and fungal disease is rare. We have only applied fungicide twice over the last 20 years.

Waste Management

No waste audits have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility manages key waste streams as follows:

Re-use Recycle Landfill Incinerate
Glass false true false false
Plastic false true false false
Aluminium false true false false
Metal false true false false
Paper & Cardboard false true false false
Grass Clippings true false false false
Cores & Turf true false false false
Sand true false false false
Wood / Timber true true false false

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to continue the lifecycle of materials and resources:

Activity Description
Separation of recyclable materials Office - Re use paper which has been printed on one side. Double sided printing. Waste paper and cardboard recycled. Plastic packaging and batteries collected by PA to the Secretary and taken to local tip for recycling. Toner cartridges sent to Dogs Trust charity for recycling.
Kitchen - Food waste is put into a food composting bin.
Bar - Glass and tins are recycled
Establishment of recycling centers None
Returning clipping to fairways and walkways Clippings are returned on all areas apart from greens, apron, tees and rough areas being managed to increase biodiversity.
Education of staff and customer education Staff training includes waste reduction and recycling
Waste awareness campaigns Staff are encouraged to reduce waste and to recycle wherever possible

Pollution Control

We protect the local environment by maintaining the course with very low inputs of fertilizer and pesticides and by following best practice in the use of these products.

Water Analysis

This golf facility monitors water quality with the following frequency:

Chemical Biological Visual
Inflow Yearly Never Weekly
On-Site Yearly Never Weekly
Outflow Never Never Never

Waste Water

Waste water from this golf facility is managed as follows:

Discharges to Formal Discharge Agreement
Golf Course N/A N/A
Clubhouse Mains Sewer N/A
Maintenance Facility Septic Tank N/A
Wash Pad Reed Bed N/A

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials at this golf facility are handled and disposed of as follows:

Secure Storage Registered Uplift
Detergents true true
Cooking Oils true true
Lubricants true true
Pesticide Containers true true
Fertiliser Bags true true
Oil Filters true true
Batteries true true

Pollution Prevention

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution from its maintenance facility and clubhouse:

Activity Description
Storage of equipment and hazardous products on covered, sealed impervious areas All machinery is stored in covered sealed and impervious areas
All hazardous products are stored in secure, covered, sealed and impervious areas
Maintenance of equipment on covered, sealed impervious areas All machinery maintenance, repairs and servicing is carried out in a covered, sealed and impervious area.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers in covered areas N/A
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers over impervious surfaces All mixing of pesticides and fertilizers is carried out over impervious surfaces
Installation of above-ground fuel tanks Our fuel tanks are all above ground
Installation of sufficient secondary containment for fuel Our diesel tank is bunded
Provision of containment booms and absorbent materials A spill kit is provided

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution on its golf course:

Activity Description
Eliminating leachate and run-off through careful timing of turf inputs Our very low fertilizer and pesticide inputs minimize the potential for leaching and run off.
Establishment of vegetative buffer strips around water bodies No spraying is done within 10m of water features
Establishment of emergency spillage response plan We have emergency procedures in place for spillage
Controlling erosion and sediment discharge N/A
Establishment of pesticide-free zones Pesticide inputs are very low and confined to the fine turf areas.
Use of swales and bio-filters to slow and treat surface run-off Our very free draining sandy soil means that there is no run off

Community

We are actively involved in theAldeburgh Business Assn. and various local organisations use our facilities during the course of the year - For example Aldeburgh Bowls Club AGM, Aldeburgh Music Society AGM and Cinema Club AGM. Member of Alde & Orr Partnership.

Employment & Education

Typical staffing levels at this golf facility are:

Full Time Part Time Seasonal
Club Management 2 1
Course Management 8 3
Food & Beverage 8 1
Golf Coaching 2 1
Other 1

The sustainability working group at this golf facility is comprised of:

  • General Manager
  • Course Manager
  • Committee Members

Employees at this golf facility receive the following formal and informal environmental education:

Activity Description
Storage, application and disposal of pesticides All staff who use pesticides are qualified and formally trained
Efficient water management Irrigation policy and efficient irrigation scheduling.
Management of accidents and emergencies First aid training
Management of habitats and vegetation BTME courses and FSC courses
In house training
Waste minimization, separation and recycling In house
Health & Safety Formal and informal
Energy Saving In house
Understanding of landscape and cultural heritage In house
Environmental management planning In house plus BTME

Community Relations

This golf facility engages with local community groups in the following manner:

Activity Description
Neighbours Estates Committee liaises with local residents.
Local Government Suffolk Coastal District Council - Collaborated with permissive foot path.
Local Environmental Groups Wildlife trust
RSPB
Suffolk Wildlife Trust - Business Membership
Local Community Groups See above
Media N/A
Local Businesses We are actively involved in Aldeburgh Business Assn.
Schools & Colleges Work experience

Land Use & Cultural Heritage

This golf facility provides access and diversified land use for others through:

Activity Description
Maintenance of existing public paths We maintain the public footpaths crossing the course by trimming back encroaching scrub and mowing out where required. We also make sure that the footpaths are clearly marked and that safety signs are in place where appropriate.
Creation of new paths and nature trails We worked with Suffolk Coastal Council to provide a permissive footpath on the course that enables pedestrians to avoid walking on a dangerous stretch of road.
Installation of effective and welcoming signage Installed
Providing opportunities for other recreation (e.g. fishing) Dog walking, watching wildlife
Partnership conservation and access projects (e.g. community woodland) Suffolk Community Barn Owl Project
Continuation of traditional agricultural activities Our stewardship land is maintained by sheep grazing.

No archaeological or heritage surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility does not consult any organizations regarding the conservation of cultural heritage.

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to conserve cultural heritage features:

Activity Description
Buildings (Listed Buildings / Ancient Monuments etc) None
Archaeology (Settlements / Agricultural System etc) None
Historic Features (Hedgerows / Dykes / Moats / Cairns etc) The golf course itself could be considered a cultural heritage feature.

Communications

This golf facility undertakes the following internal environmental communications:

Activity Description
Provision of newsletters, notice boards & poster display Captains newsletter, monthly course newsletter, course managers blog, two twitter accounts, one for members, one for the industry. Open meetings, notices, website.
Environmental notice board.
Members evenings and course walks We hold occasional members evenings and course walks looking at wildlife and wild flowers.
Interpretation panels & course signage Environment notice board
We aim to minimise course signage to maintain a natural looking heathland environment.
Establishment of a nature trail No formal nature trail but the Course Manager updates his blog with interesting sightings and information about what to look out for.

This golf facility undertakes the following social and environmental advocacy activities:

Activity Description
Website, press releases & brochures Website and blog
Supporting campaigns Accredited Bronze Carbon Charter Status in 2014 and Silver Status in 2017.
Course walks / open days None for the general public, but occasional course walks with industry groups or individuals
Attending community meetings Alde and Ore partnership
Joint practical projects with community Permissive footpath along Saxmundham road