Woburn Golf Club

GEO Certified® 12/2013 GEO Re-Certified 11/2016
Milton Keynes,
England, United Kingdom
Telephone: 01908 370756
Marquess_7th_club_image

Woburn Golf Club is situated around 3 miles south east of Milton Keynes, on the Bedford estate which has a range of commercial activities including Woburn safari park commercial forestry and of course the golf club.

Woburn Golf Club comprises the Dukes and Duchess courses that were originally developed in the 1970s with the Marquess course added in 2000. The nature and size of the golf course area has allowed 3 tree-lined courses providing different challenges with the original courses requiring pinpoint accuracy from both tee and approach…

Tony Hanson, GEOSA, Accredited Verifier Read verifier report.

GEO Certified® Report

GEO Certified® is the symbol of great golf environments worldwide – designating that a golf facility has met a credible standard in the areas of nature, water, energy, supply chain, pollution control, and community, and is committed to continually improve. GEO Certified® is widely trusted and endorsed by a growing number of organizations and people, both inside and outside golf.

Click below to read about the activities undertaken by this golf facility to operate sustainably.

Facility details

Golf Courses
Dukes (18 holes, 6983 yards, year opened 1976)
Duchess (18 holes, 6651 yards, year opened 1978)
Marquess (18 holes, 7214 yards, year opened 2000)
1 Clubhouse(s)
3 Maintenance Facility/Facilities
2 Halfway House(s)

Nature

Woburn Golf Club is situated three miles west of Woburn village and four miles south-east of Central Milton Keynes. The club is part of the Bedford Estate and the total site area is 245 hectares, of which 135 hectares is woodland.
There are 3 courses, The Dukes which opened in 1976, The Duchess’ in 1978. And The Marquess in 2000. Most of the playing areas have been cut from commercial woodland and the different tree ages and stand composition give each course its own distinct character.
A Woodland management plan is in place for all 3 courses, the aim of this management plan is to assess the current woodland resources and identify the key features which are integral to this unique setting for the golf courses and to the golfing challenge the courses provide.

Consultation & Surveys

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding landscape heritage conservation:

  • The Tree and Woodland Company

The following landscape assessments and surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Woodland Management Plan The Tree and Woodland Company 2011/03/03

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding ecosystem protection and enhancement:

  • The Landscape agency

The following ecological surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Woodland Management Plan The Landscape agency 2007/06/04

Rare, protected and notable species occurring at this golf facility:

Local name Scientific name
Barbastelle Bat Barbastella barbastellus
Song Thrush Turdus philomelos
Linnet Carduelis cannabina
Spotted Flycatcher Muscicapa striata
Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus
Wood warbler Phylloscopus sibilatrix
Long eared owl Strix otus
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos minor
Common Lizard Lacerta vivipara
Slow Worm Anguis fragilis
Red Kite Milvus milvus
Black Squirrel Sciurus carolinensin

This golf facility does not monitor any species as indicators of environmental quality.

Habitats & Designations

This golf facility does not feature any landscape designations.

Area of habitats / vegetation types, and associated designations at this golf facility:

Title Estimated Area (Hectares) Designation
Scrub Vegetation 30 Self Appointed
Native Woodland 250 Self Appointed
Hedge Laying 1 Self Appointed

Turfgrass

Size and estimated species composition of amenity turfgrass maintained at this golf facility.

Estimated Area (Hectares) Turfgrass Species Sward Composition (%)
Greens 3.0 Hectares Poa annua 60%
Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 40%
Tees 3.0 Hectares Poa annua 50%
Lolium perenne 50%
Fairways 25.0 Hectares Poa annua 50%
Lolium perenne 50%
Semi Rough 6.0 Hectares Poa annua 50%
Lolium perenne 50%

These turfgrasses are optimal for the circumstances at this club because:
The location of the site gives us the climate of cool moist conditions for the majority of the year without the extremes of south east heat or far north cold. The site is heavily shaded with mature deciduous and evergreen trees and the elevation / soil composition give cool soil temperatures well into the start of the growing season. These conditions provide the perfect climate for the growth of Poa annua / biotype reptans to thrive and naturalise into the dominant species.

This golf facility assesses mowing patterns every: 1 months

This golf facility consults the following individuals / organizations regarding its grassing plan:

  • Robert Laycock Consultancy.
  • Sportsturf research institute ( STRI )

This golf facility is making the following efforts to manage the playing quality expectations of customers:

Activity Description
Establishing clear internal policies for irrigation, fertilization, colour, cutting heights, overseeding etc Communication of fertilisation plans, use of slow release products and technologies to preserve water usage are outlined through formal & informal meetings with the membership and customer base. Newsletter articles are timed to coincide with periods of drought, up coming overseeding projects etc.
Promoting the playing quality values of more naturalized turf, particularly fairways and semi-rough By demonstrating the benfits of our own naturalised Woburn Poa annua ssp reptans vs many of the desired "new cultivars" we have shown we are performing to high standard with the most natural species for our location.
Promoting the financial benefits of presenting sustainable surfaces We provide regular reports to the management team on the ongoing utility costs and ways in which we can effect usage of resources. eg. forecasts of incoming rain quantity vs irrigation desire to balance the cost & effect of utilising potable water.
Improving customer understanding around greens maintenance Through attendance at membership meetings, articles in the club newsletter, features on the club website, articles in trade journals and course walks with the owner, club manager & committees we demonstrate the multiple benefits of cultural control methods in all we do.
Demonstrating the direct relationship between environmental best practice and year round high quality playing surfaces Investment in pedestrian aeration & topdressing equipment helps to maintain a dry, firm healthy sward year round, this gives turf grass the best possible chance to withstand attacks from pests and diseases and directly increases playability through the winter months.

Conservation & Enhancement

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve landscape character:

Activity Description
Allowing seasonal variation of course coloration and texture Our courses should always be representative of season with the colour & vigour of turf growth in tune with the prevailing growth conditions.
eg, lighter colour, harder & faster surfaces in a hot summer becoming greener with more growth and definition as autumn approaches.
Appropriately matching mowing lines to contours The golf course design is tailored to the mature trees on site and we mow our fairway shapes and bracken beds around these to ensure the shaping is not only natural but preserves the healthiest growing scenario for the neighbouring plants.
Protection and restoration of historic features See Reservoir construction for the preservation of nationally significant pottery kilns across the reservoir site.
Discreet on-course signage and furniture Removal of advisory / uneccesary signage over a five year period to ensure the only unnatural features are required for the movement of players of the public around the site or to protect their health and safety whilct at the club.
Conservation of specimen trees The club operates a ten year rolling woodland management plan to preserve the nature of the site for generations to come. This includes sensitive removal and replacement as well as pruning and protection of key specimens.
Screening and softening unsightly man-made features Indigenous planting around maintenance facilities and irrigation storage tanks along with soil bundings to block the view of waste areas are all employed across the site.
Wide scale foresty for stand preservation. An over arching plan of forestry rather than silviculture has been adopted in the last 2 years. This includes the re spacing of mature specimens within the large stands across the courses to allow a broader range of age and the relevant light gaps for establishment of natural regeneration.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the landscape ecology of the golf course:

Activity Description
Minimizing the amount of amenity grass The growth of wild grass beds on the Marquess course, Heather & bracken areas acorss the Dukes & Duchess courses to ensure we are only maintaining areas in play rather than wall to wall managed turf.
In 2015 we made the decision to cut less semi-rough on the Marquess course, we now cut 1 band rather than 2.
Increasing the size of habitat patches By decreasing the amount of mown rough on holes such as MQ 3rd & 15th we have increased the amount of long grass and gorse providing habitat for insects and small mammalls.
Connection of internal habitat patches These areas of longer grass & wild flower meadow provide connection between the woodland belts for native species.
Connection of patches with external habitats Management of woodland margins is designed to allow light further in to large woodland belts which connect to areas offsite. This encourage the movement of animals from the surrounding heath to feed and basc on the golf cousrses in season.
Creation of habitat corridors Hedgerows by the 1st - 5th,17th and 18th holes on the Marquess have been left to protect and encourage woodland linkages to allow bats to commute safely between their roosting and foraging areas. Existing hedges along roads to clubhouse have been hedgelayed to provide a corridor for wildlife.
Improving and diversifying habitat edges The woodland management plan is compartmentalised to favour the correct indigenous species for the given area whether this be High oak forest or mixed pine stands with bracken sub structure. The plan reflects over 14 different stand types.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the quality of habitats on the golf course:

Activity Description
Creation of botanically rich rough grassland An area of over 4ha has been set aside for rough grass and wild flower meadow around the recently constructed reservoir, areas such as Hundreds farm have been taken out of hay crop to generate a huge expanse of rough grass land adjacent to the Marquess course.
Promoting species and structurally diverse woodlands The woodland management and forestry plans aim to provide a diverse indigenous population of trees rather than a mono stand of the strongest species.
The recent forestry work allows us control more adventitious species such as birch with the stands and favour the most suitable species.
Establishment of littoral shelves and marginal vegetation in wetland areas N/A
Maintenance of an appropriate balance of open water and aquatic vegetation N/A
Naturalization of linear habitats N/A

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve and enhance biodiversity on the golf course:

Activity Description
Provision of nesting and nectar for pollinators The creation of a wild flower meadow next to the reservoir site to encourage bees.
Installation of nest boxes Nest boxes have been put up around the site to increase nesting oppurtunities, larger boxes have been provided for tawny owls and other birds of prey.
Control / management of alien species Ragwort is removed as soon as it appears with specially designed forks. In the summer of 2016 the field next to the reservoir and local roadways were cleared of ragwort which was bagged up and removed to avoid pollination.
Provision of hibernation areas Log piles, sand piles and brash piles are placed aound the site to provide areas for hibernation.
Standing dead tree trunks (Monoliths) are left to provide habitat for birds or insects.There are many hollow trees left standing that serve this purpose and provide shelter for many creatures.
Creation of micro-habitats (eg log and stone piles) Log piles, sand piles and brash piles are placed aound the site to encourage microhabitats especially in recenetly managed areas of woodland.

Water

Woburn Golf Club has completed the construction of a large reservoir that will become the main source for irrigation water. The reservoir is fed by a bore hole which is located on the edge of The Marquess course and rainfall.
The previous supply for irrigation water was potable mains, this has now changed to a reservoir source at the start of 2013.
We employ a full time irrigation manager who is responsible for the daily running and maintenance of the irrigation system, the filling and the performance of the reservoir and any repairs or modifications to ensure the system is running efficiently.
Water supply to the Clubhouse and the Green keeper’s compounds is mains water as this needs to be potable for human consumption.
Both Greenkeeping compounds have ‘Waste to Water’ recycling wash down facilities.
The irrigation system at the club is:
Fully Computer Controlled Rainbird Maxi Nimbus 2.
The system is MDPE pipework with fused joins and each sprinkler is controlled by an individual decoder. The system incorporates MI Smartphone technology for ease of use in field, has mobile alarms & the ability to amend / cancel programmes remotely due to significant weather events.
Reservoir pump sets have the ability to text message the irrigation manager if any leakage or breakdown issues occur.
The entire system is serviced every 12 Months and monitored on regular basis by the irrigation manager, courses manager and the individual course supervisory teams, this mean that re-calibration and efficiency checks can be undertaken frequently alongside amending programmes, changing arcs, adjusting runtimes & evapostrnspiation percentages.

Sources & Consumption

The following water audits have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Irrigation water supply options appraisal. Water Resource Assocaites 2010/12/01

The water used at this golf facility is drawn from the following sources:

2015 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 5,166 Cubic Metres
Golf Course Reclaimed 100% 58,536 Cubic Metres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 100% 762 Cubic Metres
2014 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 5,372 Cubic Metres
Golf Course Reclaimed 100% 48,881 Cubic Metres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 100% 916 Cubic Metres
2013 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 5,896 Cubic Metres
Golf Course Reclaimed 100% 44,542 Cubic Metres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 100% 259 Cubic Metres

Irrigation & Efficiency

The following areas receive irrigation at this golf facility:

Greens 2-3 days per week
Tees 2-3 days per week
Fairways Weekly
Semi-Rough Weekly
Rough Weekly
Other Weekly

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:
Fully computer controlled

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:

Serviced every 1 years

Upgraded every 3 years

Re-calibrated and checked for efficient application every 1 months

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to maximize irrigation efficiency:

Activity Description
Selection of grass species Species which are best suited to our environental conditions are always selected for new constructions or overseeding to ensure they thrive in our microclimatic without the need for excessive inputs of water or nutrient.
Soil decompaction and thatch management Regular aeration of greens and tees throughout the entire year by verti-drain and hollow coring. Sorrel spiking is carried out to help water penetrate surfaces.
Timing and dose of water application Dry area and hot spot programmes are created weekly to prevent over watering.
Irrigation is applied overnight to reduce evapotranspiration, this helps to improve coverage due to lower wind speeds. Hand watering is carried out to slopes and dry areas to reduce the need for automatic irrigation.
Analysis of soil moisture Soil moisture level measurement and recording is undertaken daily both manually and automatically to provide more efficient watering practices during the season.
Incorporation of evapotranspiration rates and weather data The Nimbus II system calculates E/T data and can ammend run times automatcally to reduce usage, As a rule we would only apply 60% of a recorded E/T loss and balance this with the readings taken from the soil moisture meter and our paid weather forecast for the following days.
Use of wetting agents Penetrant and multi layer surfactent wetting agents are applied to greens, tees, approaches and fairways throughout the season.
This is to increase the penetration of irrigation or rainfall into dried surfaces and to thoroughly wet and retain moisture in the rootzone.
Overall reduction in irrigated area Irrigation is limited to the main playing areas with roughs, carries being irrigated ocasionally.
Dry spot programmes have been created for pinpoint accuracy of areas requiring water.
Checking of arcs to avoid over watering.
Targeting of sprinkler heads Each sprinkler head has been set up by the irrigation engineer for optimum coverage and no areas are watered that don’t require it.
Optimizing system pressure The club employ a full time irrigation engineer who is responsible for the daily running and maintenance of the irrigation system, such as repairing any leaks or faulty heads, checking performance, monitoring borehole & reservoir levels, programming the systems.
Adoption of cutting edge nozzle technology Low pressure heads are used on the tees.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve / reduce / minimize water consumption:

Activity Description
Low-flow urinals and toilets The clubhouse toilets have been fitted with low-flow urinals and the recently refurbished locker room toilets do have the sensor flushing urinals and low flush facility on the toilets.
Use of water efficient appliances The showers in the clubhouse are water efficient, and currently on the second stage of a major refurbishment.
Use of efficient shower technology The showers in the clubhouse are water efficient, and currently on the second stage of a major refurbishment
Repairing leaks Any leaks in the clubhouse are attended to immediately by the Bedford Estate maintenance team.
Water awareness signage Signs are displayed by each sink for users to be made aware of the need for water efficiency
Reservoir Construction The construction of a reservoir to store nearly 120,000m3 of water, has now been completed which will be filled naturally and from a recently installed bore hole. This will allow the club to become self sufficient in the use of irrigation water in years to come.
Irrigation Manager The club employ a full time irrigation manager who is responsible for the daily running and maintenance of the irrigation system, such as repairing any leaks, checking performance, monitoring borehole & reservoir levels, programming the systems and liaising with utility companies / EA.
Monitoring Industry leading soil moisture & temperature recording equipment is used daily.
We remotely monitor water meters across the site to ensure no abnormality in use and we benchmark these against our recorded usage to minimse leakage potential.
Rain water harvesting Utilisation of rainwater harvesting from the clubhouse roofs to was down the golf buggy fleet.
Rainwater is harvested and stored under ground before being pumped to the buggy wash down area on demand.
This water is then collected and recycled back to the storage chamber.
This area is due for planned improvements in 2017 with a kerbed, sumped wash pad to improve the efficiency and cleanliness.

Energy

Electricity is the main fuel used in the clubhouse and Green Keeping compounds. The machinery used by the green keepers is mainly diesel and the buggies used for golfers are electric.
The clubhouse was refurbished in 2011 and all lighting is low energy and all appliances energy efficient.
No energy audits have been undertaken at Woburn Golf Club.
Natural gas consumption readings are KWh.

Sources & Consumption

No energy surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility.

Consumption of renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2015 2014 2013
On-site Solar (kWh) 5000 5000 5000

Consumption of non-renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2015 2014 2013
Diesel (Cubic Metres) 19.503 21.082 21.083
Natural Gas (Cubic Metres) 1152574 1319169 1445094
Non-renewable Grid (kWh) 807926 865688 858116
Petrol (Cubic Metres) 17.418 18.093 15.478

Energy Efficiency

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to diversify energy and fuel supply:

Activity Description
Adoption of green tariff grid supply Currently being discussed with energy supplier.
Installation of small scale wind turbine N/A
Installation of photovoltaic and / or solar panels Solar panels have been fitted to clubhouse roof and the energy stored is fed back into our usage.
New security locks on short game area are powered by solar panel.
Bagstore capital project currently in planning stages to utilise solar panels to support charging of golf buggies.
Use of geothermal and / or ground sources N/A
Use of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) N/A
Use of biodiesel and /or ethanol N/A
Use of electric hybrid vehicles All the buggies used by players and golf marshals are electric
The club have purchased a number of electric strimmers, blowers & pumps.
Since our first accreditation in 2013 we have purchased 9 hybrid mowers for the golf courses.
Another 3 hybrid vehicles are planned for 2017 capital purchase.
Use of recycled oils N/A
Natural gas Usage The natural gas consumption records above are measured in kWh and cubic meters.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to reduce energy consumption:

Activity Description
Investment in low-energy heating and air conditioning systems In the clubhouse the radiators have individual thermostats so radiators are turned down/off when not needed. The heating system is turned off during the summer.
Optimizing thermostat levels for heating and refrigeration All fridges in the kitchen have thermometers fitted which provide accurate temperature readings.
Enhancement of natural ventilation opportunities The clubhouse has two large ground floor terrace areas that are regularly open throughout the summer to give the clubhouse natural ventilation.
Reception team keep all doors through the walkway in and out of clubhouse open to allow a better ventilation through the building.
Professional shop roof windows are open during summer months to provide natural ventilation
Upgrading of building insulation The clubhouse was refurbished in 2013.
Use of natural light (e.g. sunlight pipes) The large glass panel windows in the clubhouse let through a great deal of light, ensuring the use of electrical lights is kept to a minimum, the skylight in the main clubhouse lounge also helps provide adequate natural light during the day
Installation of low-energy lighting The clubhouse was recently refurbished and all lighting is low energy.
In several areas the lights work on a movement sensor system.
A push on LED lighting being installed across the building - kitchen, function rooms and locker rooms.
Use of motion sensor lighting The clubhouse car park lights are on a timer, and go off outside business core hours; this also means that power is only used when required during opening hours.
Toilets in the clubhouse have motion sensor lighting permantly
Transition to energy efficient appliances The locker room and swimming pool changing room lights have been recently changed from halogen GU10’s to LED fittings which will save a great deal of energy.
Low energy light bulbs are used as replacements when possible
Use of timers with appliances, heating and lighting The clubhouse car park lights are on a timer, and go off outside business core hours; this also means that power is only used when required during opening hours
In the clubhouse the radiators have individual thermostats so radiators are turned down/off when not needed.
Educating staff and customers All staff are reminded to turn lights off when they are not being used, wastage is kept to a minimum in all departments, if something can be re-used they will try their best to. This is communicated in staff meetings and Head of Department meetings.

Vehicles & Transport

The maintenance fleet at this golf facility uses the following fuel sources:

Ride-on Mowers Walking Mowers Utility Vehicles
Petrol 0% 100% 35%
Diesel 70% 0% 58%
Grid Electric 8%
Hybrid 30%

Additional vehicles operated by this golf facility use the following fuel sources:

Golf Carts Cars Buses
Petrol 17%
Diesel 83%
Grid Electric 100%

This golf facility has established the following schemes to encourage reductions in staff and customer transport emissions:

Activity Description
Car sharing incentives Some members of the Greenkeeper team share lifts to and from work daily.
All staff that live close to each other are encouraged to car share and shifts can be allocated to allow this to happen.
Group transportation (e.g. buses) The club has visitors that stay in an associated hotel located in the village of Woburn and a diesel mini bus is used to take them to the clubhouse during their stay. The bus is also used to take staff to seminars, trade shows, site visits and HOD team to monthly offsite meetings
Secure cycle parking An area outside the clubhouse is used by staff to park their bikes securely.
Promoting public transport routes and timetables No public transport available due to location.
Increasing equipment storage (e.g. lockers) Squash courts have been changed into a storage facility for members golf bags and trolleys along with good locker storage throughout the club for staff and golfers, to minimise the daily transportation of clubs, trolleys & batteries etc
Storage onsite is offered to remove the need for daily transport by the golfer
Staff showers Staff are provided with shower facilities in both green keeping compounds or can use the showers in the visitors’ locker rooms prior to playing golf after work. The clubhouse staff have shower facilities in the changing room facilities in the staff room.
Tax breaking incentives for cycling N/A
Promotion of walk to work campaigns Not possible due to location of the club.
Buggy Use Encouraged the use of single seat buggies in the winter for older golfers.
Discourages the need for large two seater biggies to be used with higher power output.

Supply Chain

Woburn Golf Club’s mission statement is to create a great and memorable golfing experience and to achieve this we try to source high quality products for use across the whole of the club. Sand for bunkers and top dressing is from Heath and Reach which is 2 miles from the course.
Fertilisers are now purchased in bulk to minimise deliveries and a new fertiliser and chemical container have been installed at both green keeping compounds.
The Head Chef purchases his food from local suppliers and packaging is kept to a minimum with all empty containers, bottles and packaging being recycled.

Purchasing Policies

This golf facility undertakes the following ethical / environmental purchasing activities:

Activity Description
Measures to avoid waste at source Food stuffs/chemicals are bought in bulk to avoid packaging waste and minimise delivery journeys.
Fertlisers and loose aggregate supplies are bought in bulk and stored in purpose built bays to reduce packaging.
7 extra bays have been built since accreditation, Including 3 on the Marquess course to avoid double handing.
Use of local suppliers The use of local suppliers for food, office supplies, sands and top dressings.
The Chef uses a local butcher situated only 3 miles away. Golf course tools and furniture are manufactured in Luton which is 20 miles away.
Use of local products Sand from a quarry that is just located 2 miles from the Club is used in Bunkers and for top dressing. Our chef’s philosophy is to use as much local produce as possible. The bar uses a local brewery to source and purchase ale from.
Selection of certified products Only certified fertilisers, chemicals and cleaning products are purchased by the club.
Use of recycled and recyclable products Cores from greens are used as rootzone fill and have been used to create entire new greens on the Short game area, sand taken from bunkers when weeding and re-edging is re-used in drainage projects or as topdressing and wood that has fallen from trees or removed is used for firewood.
Selection of products that feature minimal packaging Fertilisers and wetting agents are purchased in 1000L / 200L and 100L drums to reduce packaging. Purpose built stores were constructed to enable this reduction in packaging & transport.
Use of accredited suppliers (e.g. ISO 14001) Ransomes Jacobsen are one of our main suppliers of turf machinery and are ISO 14001 accredited.

Supply Chain

An overview of the supplier network at this golf facility:

Total number of suppliers Total number of suppliers within 10 Miles Total number of suppliers within 100 Miles
Food & Beverage 20 1 19
Catering Supplies 4 4
Retail 37 3 12
Trade & Contractors 3 3
Maintenance Equipment 3 3
Course Supplies 23 12 11

Turfgrass Inputs

This golf facility undertakes the following IPM activities:

Activity Description
Encouraging drought and disease tolerant grasses Greens and approaches are regularly top dressed with local kiln dried sand and aeration to playing surfaces by verti-drain & hollow coring is carried out regularly to help keep them healthy. Spoon feeding of nutrients, regular agronomic checks and cultrual practices such as dew removal help to reduce chemical inputs.
Managing stress and wear We use of turf rollers to allow an increase in the height of cut whilst maintaining good green speeds and reducing the amount of mowing days required.
We monitor soil moisture & light exposure to areas to determine irrigation needs, hand watering is undertaken to prevent overwatering on all areas.
Enhancement of soil structure The greens on all 3 courses are hollow cored annually with sand being brushed into the holes to improve the soil structure of these areas, this is also carried out on some of the wet tees around the site after vert-draining.
Regular decompaction is undertaken to keep the soil friable and aerobic.
Optimization of the growing environment Removal of selection trees which cast heavy deciduous shade and the removal of low lying scrub in areas to allow better air circulation are all undertaken to promote healthy growing environments.
Managing thatch levels Correct nurtient inputs, scarification, verticutting and thatch dilution from light topdresings are regularly undertaken to ensure thatch build up is controlled.
Levels are checked buy two independent agronomists at the surface and at incremental depths to allow targetted control.
Managing surface moisture Golf course greens are regularly GPS mapped and tested to manage surface moisture at the desired levels. Pioneering drainage methods such as vertical drainage and dryject operations are implemented to move moisture through the profile quickly.
Establishing thresholds for pests and disease Disease forecast models and regular rmonitoring of surface areas is undertaken to keep disease actvity to a minimum. The strength of any disease infestation is measured against the upcoming weather and any forecast change in enviromental conditions.
Scouting for pests and diseases Visual checks from staff for disease or pests such as leather jacket, worm casts are done whilst they carry out their daily tasks setting up the golf courses.
Monitoring / improvement of plant health Weekly & monthly course checks are undertaken by the general manager and courses manager along with quarterly agronomic checks by two independent agronomists to ensure improvement in plant health is maintained.
Applications in isolation Indicator areas and greens are used to monitor disease infection and population, these greens are often sprayed in isolation as individual applications.
These sprays are generally made with natural plant auxins and elicitors to enhance the efficacy of the applications.

Fertilizer use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2015 2014 2013
Fairways - K - Inorganic 45 45 45
Fairways - K - Organic 0 0 0
Fairways - N - Inorganic 94.73 95.12 93.86
Fairways - N - Organic 0 0 0
Fairways - P - Inorganic 9 9 9
Fairways - P - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - K - Inorganic 31.38 22.6 29.5
Greens - K - Organic 55 38.5 0
Greens - N - Inorganic 91.08 91.45 107.4
Greens - N - Organic 28.14 27.68 0.32
Greens - P - Inorganic 32.52 10.44 22.41
Greens - P - Organic 21 16.5 0
Rough - K - Inorganic 20 20 29.75
Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Inorganic 36 36.77 21
Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - P - Inorganic 10 10 21
Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - K - Inorganic 125.6 77.6 84.3
Tees - K - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - N - Inorganic 100.69 185.43 143.65
Tees - N - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - P - Inorganic 13.9 35.6 53.53
Tees - P - Organic 0 0 0

Pesticide use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2015 2014 2013
Fairways - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Fairways - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 4.625 0 0
Fairways - Herbicide - Total Weight 18.5 0 0
Fairways - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 0 0
Fairways - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 15 14.85 4.8
Fairways - Insecticide - Total Weight 32.66 22.77 57.60
Fairways - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 4 4 1
Greens - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 20.50 34.16 37.50
Greens - Fungicide - Total Weight 47.40 167.06 130.10
Greens - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 7 11 11
Greens - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Greens - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 4.8
Greens - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 7.2
Greens - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 1
Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 5 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0.6 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 1 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 5.34 4.5 0
Tees - Fungicide - Total Weight 8 10 0
Tees - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 2 2 0
Tees - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 23.75 0
Tees - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 14.25 0
Tees - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 1 0
Tees - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 5 9.8 4.8
Tees - Insecticide - Total Weight 10 27.2 4.8
Tees - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 1 2 1

This golf facility undertakes the following actions to optimize pesticide use:

Activity Description
Selection on the least toxic and lest persistent products We always study the pesticides we purchase to look for the least toxic product.
Spray staff are trained to a high level, with BASIS qualified staff on site.
Regular refresher courses by suppliers and industry leaders are regularly attended to ensure knowldge is current.
Selection of appropriate products for specific pests and diseases We only use products on pests or diseases as recommended by the label and at the recommended amounts and water volume.
Spot-treatment with handheld sprayers and wipers Virtually all weed control on Greens, fairways and tees is done by hand weeding or the use of hand held weed spray cans.
Calibration and testing of sprayers All sprayers are NPTC tested annually and serviced, maintained and calibrated before each spray application.
Use of shrouded sprayer and anti-drip nozzles The boom sprayers are fitted with anti drip and bubble jet nozzles to reduce drift, spraying is done early morning to mitigate the effects of the wind and avoid exposure to golfers on the courses.
Non-chemical weed control All hard surfaced areas around the clubhouse have weed control by a gas burning unit. Hand picking of ragwort is undertaken across the entire site.
Suitable Conditions for optimal efficancy. Monitor weather forecasts, air & soil temps and soil moisture to ensure best possible conditions for spraying & efficancy.

Waste Management

No waste audits have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility manages key waste streams as follows:

Re-use Recycle Landfill Incinerate
Glass false true false false
Plastic false true false false
Aluminium false true false false
Metal false true false false
Paper & Cardboard false true false false
Grass Clippings false true false false
Cores & Turf true false false false
Sand true false false false
Wood / Timber true false false false

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to continue the lifecycle of materials and resources:

Activity Description
Separation of recyclable materials Paper, cardboard, glass and plastics are all seperated at the clubhouse and disposed of in specific containers.
Waste from across the site is taken by Cawleys to their recycling plant where it is sorted and recycled.
Course attendants are employed who collect litter from across the course and sort it out for recycling.
Establishment of recycling centers Since accreditation we have thirty recycling bins in use across the club for paper, mixed recycling such as plastic, cans, newspapers and plastic bottles, and general waste.
Returning clipping to fairways and walkways Boxes are not fitted to fairway mowers so clippings are returned to the surfaces, staff scatter grass clippings when cutting greens,tees or approaches to weak or bare areas around the courses to help promote growth from seed heads.
Education of staff and customer education Staff at the clubhouse are trained to dispose of waste in the correct manner.
Waste awareness campaigns In 2016 the club introduced 30 recycling bins across the site and made staff aware of the reasoning behind the importance of recycling.
General waste bins were removed from individual offices & central recycling points introduced.
Re Use of Cores For Construction In 2014 we constructed our Short game practice facility, over 6 million cores collected from the Marquess and Duchess greens were used as the surface of 2 greens. This practise is now used for other construction projects undertaken across the site such as the new tees constructed on the Marquess course in 2016.

Pollution Control

Woburn Golf Club lays on a sandy soil structure which drains extremely well, however some of the terrain is undulating and in these valleys clay & alluvial pockets are present creating an environment in which water does not drain away as quickly .
These pockets have pipe drainage installed by the in house green keeping team and aeration and topdressing is increased to imrpove the percolation rate in these areas.
The water collected by theses drains runs off the play areas and filters through the naturally sandy soil.
Both Green keeping compounds have a ‘waste 2 water’ wash down bay which is a wash water recycling system with an enclosed water loop and an interceptor tank in place to contain any fuel spillage from the fuel compound.

Water Analysis

This golf facility monitors water quality with the following frequency:

Chemical Biological Visual
Inflow Monthly Yearly Daily
On-Site Monthly Yearly Daily
Outflow Two Yearly Two Yearly Monthly

Waste Water

Waste water from this golf facility is managed as follows:

Discharges to Formal Discharge Agreement
Golf Course Stormwater Drain N/A
Clubhouse Mains Sewer Yes
Maintenance Facility Mains Sewer Yes
Wash Pad Closed Loop Recycling N/A

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials at this golf facility are handled and disposed of as follows:

Secure Storage Registered Uplift
Detergents false true
Cooking Oils false true
Lubricants true true
Pesticide Containers true true
Fertiliser Bags true false
Oil Filters true true
Batteries true true

Pollution Prevention

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution from its maintenance facility and clubhouse:

Activity Description
Storage of equipment and hazardous products on covered, sealed impervious areas 2 new chemical containers have been installed and all chemicals and hazardous products are stored indoors in a secure controlled environment.
The 2 diesel tanks on site are bunded and an interceptor tank is in place in case of any petroleum leak.
Maintenance of equipment on covered, sealed impervious areas The maintenance of machinery is carried out within the workshop and any spillage would be contained within the area with designated spill kits.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers in covered areas The mixing of pesticides and fertilisers takes place in the chemical containers which are bunded and on the wash bays which are on an enclosed water system.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers over impervious surfaces The mixing of pesticides and fertilisers takes place on the wash bays which are on an enclosed water system.
Installation of above-ground fuel tanks The 2 diesel tanks on site are bunded and an interceptor tank is in place in case of any petroleum leak.
Installation of sufficient secondary containment for fuel A fuel compound has been constructed with drains which lead to an interceptor tank in the event of any spillage. The diesel tank is bunded & fuel cabinets are also bunded.
Provision of containment booms and absorbent materials Spill kits are located around the fuel compound and workshop in case of any spillage.
Fuel Monitoring In 2014 WGC purchased an electronic monitoring system for its 2 fuel tanks at a cost of £5000, this enables 24 hour monitoring for leaks or water contamination within the tanks and a precise wet stock management system.

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution on its golf course:

Activity Description
Establishment of vegetative buffer strips around water bodies There is a pond close to a green on the Marquess course and an open ditch on the 4th Dukes course which have been highlighted in the LERAP assessment undertaken; buffer zones are therefore in place.
Establishment of emergency spillage response plan An emergency plan is in place in the event of any major spillage, this is also covered in great detail in the DSEAR risk assessment for the fuel compound.
Controlling erosion and sediment discharge All spray technicians are qualified and refreshed in the application and handling of chemicals. Sprayers are cleaned after use and maintained on a regular basis. Two new sprayers where purchased in 2014.

Community

Woburn Golf Club was founded in 1976 with the opening of the "Dukes course", the "Duchess Course" soon followed in 1978, and the "Marquess Course" in the year 2000.
Between 1979 and 2002 The British Masters was staged at Woburn sixteen times, the first of which was on the Duke’s Course in 1979 moving to the Marquess’ course in 2001 and 2002. The Heritage, anothe PGA tour event was also staged at Woburn in 2004. Since 2001 The European Seniors Tour has played the European Senior Masters on the Duke’s course. Woburn has also hosted ladies Professional tournaments with the Ladies Classic on the Duke’s Course in 1982 through to 1984, moving to the Duchess’ course from 1985 to 1994. The Women’s Open Championship was played on the Duke’s Course in 1984 and was then played each year from 1991 through until 1996 returning again in 1999. In addition to hosting in excess of 50 Professional Tournaments Woburn has also hosted the Brabazon Trophy in 1982, the Seniors Open Amateur Championship in 2005 and the English Amateur Championship in 2011. Since 1978 the Prince of Wales Amateur Trophies have been staged at Woburn for young men under the age of 21 with the introduction of a trophy for young ladies since 1987.
Woburn has been selected by the R&A to host the final qualifying for The Open Championship in 2014.
These prestigious events give the local communtiy the opportunity to watch, work and play alongside some of the biggest names in golf and provide cultural and economic benefits to the entire local area.
Woburn golf club has one of the largest junior sections in the area and we consistently look to support young golfers in the pursuit their dream through coaching sessions, membership availability and access to our club stars such as Ian Poulter.

Employment & Education

Typical staffing levels at this golf facility are:

Full Time Part Time Seasonal
Club Management 7
Course Management 31 4
Food & Beverage 16 36 16
Golf Coaching 4
Retail & Leisure 8 11 1
Caddies 20

The sustainability working group at this golf facility is comprised of:

  • General Manager
  • Course Manager
  • Committee Members
  • Members of staff with intrest in environmental issues.
  • Members of staff with intrest in environmental issues.

Employees at this golf facility receive the following formal and informal environmental education:

Activity Description
Storage, application and disposal of pesticides Storage, application and disposal of pesticides is part of the NVQ exams which all of the green keeping team have passed or are currently achieving.
Each golf course has specialised member of staff for pesticide duties qualified all the way up to BASIS level.
Efficient water management During the construction of the reservoir all members of staff attended site visits which explained the importance of efficient water use, our Irrigation Manager runs tool box talks throughout the summer on the current topics of wetting agents, hand watering etc.
Management of accidents and emergencies All staff attend a “Health & safety week” where they are trained in Emergency procedures, reporting accidents, reporting faulty machinery, manual handling, fire awareness etc.
All staff receive this on their induction days and have ongoing training on individual machinery and operating procedures.
Management of habitats and vegetation Each course has a member of staff who has received training related to the Woodland management plan; this includes practical management and involvement in the overall goal of a sustainable woodland providing the ideal habitat for many of our indigenous species.
Waste minimization, separation and recycling Staff are informed of the importance and needs to minimize and seperate waste for recycling. This includes seperation of glass, baling of cardboard etc in the clubhouse area. In 2016 WGC installed recycling bins across the whole of the club.
Health & Safety All staff are trained in Fire awareness, Nine staff are trained as Fire Marshalls.
Each course has a trained first aider and approx imately 10 members of staff in the clubhouse are trained first aiders and trained in defibrillator use. 9 team members trained as lifeguards
Energy Saving All staff are reminded in team meetings to turn off any lights when leaving buildings and not to leave engines running on machinery when not in use.
Understanding of landscape and cultural heritage Awareness that the courses were created out of Bedford Estates woodland, areas of which were used during World War 2 .
Environmental management planning Each course has a member of staff who has received training related to the Woodland management plan this includes practical management and involvement in the overall goal of a sustainable woodland providing the ideal habitat for many of our indigenous species.

Community Relations

This golf facility engages with local community groups in the following manner:

Activity Description
Neighbours During the recent major tournaments held here at WGC, the club has involed local residents groups in neighbouring villages of increase in traffic and road closures during the events. As a good will gesture tickets were available to residents living in the immediate vicinity free of charge.
Local Government The practice ground on The Marquess course is used by the local Police force for the training of Police Dogs
Local Community Groups Woburn Golf Club provides vouchers for fundraising in support of local schools and associations.
Local Brownie pack has been introduced to the game of golf with a group lesson from the WGC Professionals.
Supports a number of local charities with the provision of fourball vouchers for auction.
Media Prior to and during the Ricoh Womens British Open there was media coverage surrounding a competition held in conjunction with a local school, which engaged the children in designing items associated with the tournament for sale in support of charity.
Local Businesses Hosts an annual charity golf day in support of MacIntyre charities.
Supports a number of local charities with the provision of fourball vouchers for auction. Approach many local business to offer golf coaching in the workplace as an employee benefit.
Schools & Colleges Woburn Golf Club provides vouchers for fundraising in support of local schools.
Local Bedford school uses the club regularly for their golf team & coaching.
Junior golf clinics are held in the summer for local school children. We work with the neighbouring village schools to provide coaching to as many of the children as possible. As previously stated we ran an initiative to engage with the local school in designing locker plaques and putter covers for the players which raised money and awareness of the supported charities.

Land Use & Cultural Heritage

This golf facility provides access and diversified land use for others through:

Activity Description
Maintenance of existing public paths A public bridleway runs through the Dukes course which is used members of the public to walk, horse ride or ride bikes. This path is maintained by the green keeping team who have recently replanted alongside the path to protect walkers from the risk of being hit by golf balls.
Creation of new paths and nature trails There is a public footpath located behind the 17th tee on The Marquess which is also maintained regularly by the green keepers.
New footpath routes have been created since the construction of the reservoir.
Maintains footpaths & surrounding woodlands for access to the general public
Installation of effective and welcoming signage Signage is low key but informative to our customers and visitors.
Providing opportunities for other recreation (e.g. fishing) A bridleway that runs through the middle of the Duke's course is used by horse riders, dog walkers and cyclists daily.
Neighbouring woodland is used regularly by cyclists and ramblers.
Partnership conservation and access projects (e.g. community woodland) N/A
Continuation of traditional agricultural activities N/A

The following archaeological and heritage surveys have been carried out at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
An Archaeological Gazetteer Buckinghamshire County Museum 2006/01/01
Archaeological survey Headland Archaeology 2012/12/01

This golf facility does not consult any organizations regarding the conservation of cultural heritage.

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to conserve cultural heritage features:

Activity Description
Buildings (Listed Buildings / Ancient Monuments etc) N/A
Archaeology (Settlements / Agricultural System etc) Prior to construction of the new reservoir located on the Marquess course an archaeological survey was carried out by Headland Archaeology, this included 4 months of excavation across 5ha of the reservoir site & golf course.Nationally important Roman pottery kilns & a settlement were found, excavated, recorded etc
Historic Features (Hedgerows / Dykes / Moats / Cairns etc) N/A

Communications

This golf facility undertakes the following internal environmental communications:

Activity Description
Provision of newsletters, notice boards & poster display A newsletter for members and staff is published quarterly which covers any significant issues and notice boards, poster displays located around the club and a dedicated area on the website provide members with information and news. Regular emails are sent by the club from the Club Captain detailing information such as course maintenance.
Members evenings and course walks Course walks take place each month and rotate around the 3 courses, The Courses manager, Head Green keeper, General Manager and invited members of staff or members walk the course discussing future work and have the opportunity to discuss our environmental work like the woodland management plan
Course guides / brochures Course guides and brochures provide information on the golf courses.
Interpretation panels & course signage Golf course signage is kept discreet and is consistent.
Establishment of a nature trail N/A

This golf facility undertakes the following social and environmental advocacy activities:

Activity Description
Website, press releases & brochures Any articles of interest are posted on our website or sent to members via email.
Our website provides a lot of information about how to book, cost and availability rather than brochures being produced and there are plans to develop this further.
Supporting campaigns Greenkeeper International magazine published an article about our efforts to become self sustainable with our water requirements for the irrigation of the 3 courses.
Course walks / open days Membership course walks once a year highlighting all agronomical and environmental practices such as woodland management.
Attending community meetings N/A
Joint practical projects with community N/A