Fife Golf Trust

GEO Certified® 03/2017
Glenrothes,
Scotland, United Kingdom
Telephone: 07415 414 740
Screenshot_2015-06-18_11

This initial verification of the Fife Golf Trust (FGT) covers seven discrete sites; five 18-hole and two 9-hole courses, together with seven maintenance facilities, five of which are shared with other Fife Council services. Verification was undertaken over a two day period on 6th and 7th March 2017, consisting of an initial meeting and documentation review at FGT’s offices in Glenrothes, followed by site walkovers of all seven courses. The discussions and walkovers were attended by Paul Murphy (Golf Courses manager FGT) and Johanna Willi (Fife…

Mike Wood, GEOSA, Accredited Verifier Read verifier report.

GEO Certified® Report

GEO Certified® is the symbol of great golf environments worldwide – designating that a golf facility has met a credible standard in the areas of nature, water, energy, supply chain, pollution control, and community, and is committed to continually improve. GEO Certified® is widely trusted and endorsed by a growing number of organizations and people, both inside and outside golf.

Click below to read about the activities undertaken by this golf facility to operate sustainably.

Facility details

Golf Courses
Dunnikier Park Golf Course (18 holes, 6532 yards, year opened 1963)
Kinghorn Golf Course (18 holes, 5141 yards, year opened 1887)
Glenrothes Golf Course (18 holes, 6406 yards, year opened 1967)
Scoonie Golf Course (18 holes, 5494 yards, year opened 1937)
Dora Golf Course (18 holes, 6207 yards, year opened 1996)
Lochore Meadows Golf Course (9 holes, 3207 yards, year opened 1983)
Auchterderran Golf Course (9 holes, 2625 yards, year opened 1904)
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Nature

Fife Golf Trust manages seven courses totalling just over 308 hectares in the Kingdom of Fife, Scotland. The courses are situated in a range of landscapes which have been subjected to a variety of land uses including farming, mining and parkland. Of the seven courses, Kinghorn and Scoonie are coastal links which overlook the Firth of Forth, with some former use as farmland. Dunnikier is on a former private estate with wooded parkland. Auchterderran was originally built within natural habitat on a rocky outcrop which was also believed to have been used for sheep grazing. Lochore and the first nine holes of Dora are on reclaimed coal mining land, and Glenrothes and the nine hole extension at Dora are on former farmland. All courses are within or on the outskirts of a town or village.

Approximately 228 of the 308 hectares are managed for golf. The remaining 26% is comprised of a variety of habitats including mixed woodland, scrub, hedgerows, grassland, wetland and freshwater. As such, the courses are an important local amenity resource providing quality green space for local residents as well as a valuable mosaic of habitats for a range of wildlife including flora and fauna. This diversity of habitats is particularly important within the context of the Fife landscape, which is one of the most intensively farmed areas in Scotland with 65% of land in arable production.

The Fife Golf Trust is committed to protecting and enhancing the habitats on its courses for wildlife, as well as increasing the area of these habitats. Most notably in recent years, significant enhancements have been made to the freshwater ecosystem, including the de-culverting of sections of streams on five courses, and the creation of new ponds. In addition, substantial changes have been made to grassland management in order to increase the area of species-rich grassland. A contractor has just been appointed to survey the woodland resource with a view to creating a five-year management plan.

Consultation & Surveys

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding landscape heritage conservation:

  • Fife Council - Biodiversity Team
  • Fife Nature Records Centre (formerly FERN and TAPIFEN)
  • Scottish Golf Environment Group
  • Scottish Rural University College - Elmwood College
  • Hole18
  • Scottish Golf Ltd
  • STRI
  • Fife Coast & Countryside Trust

The following landscape assessments and surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Auchterderran Golf Course Management Plan April 2005-March 2009: an overview of the Auchterderran Golf Course environment and a strategy for its conservation and enhancement as part of Fife Council's seven course strategy Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/08/18 Download
Auchterderran Golf Course: Summary Environmental Report Scottish Golf Environment Group 2004/11/12 Download
Dora Golf Course Environmental Management Plan 2007-2010 Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2007/05/22 Download
Dora Golf Course: Summary Environment Report Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/10/01 Download
Dunnikier Golf Course Environment Management Plan 2006-2009 Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/02/24 Download
Dunnikier Golf Course Summary Environmental Report Scottish Golf Environment Group 2004/11/01 Download
Glenrothes Golf Course Environment Management Plan 2007-2010 Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/09/01 Download
Glenrothes Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2005 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2005/06/01 Download
Kinghorn Golf Course Environment Management Plan 2008-2011 Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2008/06/01 Download
Kinghorn Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2007 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2007/04/01 Download
Lochore Meadows Golf Course Environment Management Plan 2007-2010 Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2007/05/01 Download
Lochore Meadows Summary Environmental Report 2005 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2005/09/01 Download
Scoonie Golf Course Environment Management Plan 2008-2011 Fife Council with assistance from Hole 18 Consulting the Scottish Golf Environment Group 2008/06/01 Download
Scoonie Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2006 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/04/01 Download
Fife's Buzzing Pollinator Survey Report - Year 2 Buglife - Gabrielle Flinn and Suzanne Bairner 2016/01/25 Download
Fife's Buzzing Pollinator Survey Report - Year 1 Buglife - Suzanne Bairner 2014/11/18 Download

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding ecosystem protection and enhancement:

  • Fife Council Biodiversity Team
  • Fife Nature Records Centre (formerly FERN and TAPIFEN)
  • Scottish Golf Environment Group
  • Fife Biodiversity Partnership - Steering Group for Fife Local Biodiversity Action Plan
  • Fife Amphibian & Reptile Group
  • Buglife - The Invertebrate Conservation Trust
  • Fife & Kinross Bat Group
  • STRI
  • Scottish Golf

The following ecological surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Auchterderran Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2004 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2004/10/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Auchterderran Golf Course Biodiversity Co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/02/21 Download
Dora Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2006 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/10/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Dora Golf Course Biodiversity Co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/03/28 Download
Glenrothes Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2005 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2005/06/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Glenrothes Golf Course Biodiversity Co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/02/18 Download
Dunnikier Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2004 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2004/11/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Dunnikier Golf Course Biodiversity co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/02/28 Download
Kinghorn Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2007 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2007/04/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Kinghorn Golf Course Biodiversity co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/03/21 Download
Lochore Meadows Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2005 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2005/05/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Lochore Meadows Golf Course Biodiversity Co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/03/14 Download
Scoonie Golf Course Summary Environmental Report 2006 Scottish Golf Environment Group 2006/04/01 Download
Notes of Biodiversity Site Visit - Scoonie Golf Course Biodiversity Co-ordinator, Fife Council 2014/04/10 Download
Auchterderran Golf Course: Report of Phase 2 Survey Barbara Hogarth, Aspen Botanical Adisory Service 2005/09/20 Download
Biodiversity Action Plans for Auchterderran Golf Course non known 2003/12/01 Download

Rare, protected and notable species occurring at this golf facility:

Local name Scientific name
Pink waxcap Hygrocybe calyptriformis
Green-ribbed sedge Carex binervis
Northern marsh orchid Dactylorhiza purpurella
Hieracium sabaudum European hawkweed
Linaria vulgaris Common toadflax
Common frog Rana temporaria
Brown sedge Carex disticha
Common spotted orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsia
Pale persicaria Persicaria lapathifolia
Pond water crowfoot Ranunculus peltatus
Common darter Sympetrum striolatum
Marmalade hoverfly Episyrphus balteatus
Hoverfly Melanostoma scalare
Flower bug Anthocoris nemorum
Plant hopper Family Delphacidae
Tarnished plant bug Lygus rugulipennis
Froghopper Neophilaenus lineatus
Common froghopper Philaeneus spumarius
Grass bug Stenodema calcarata
Plant bug Stenodema holsata
Grass bug Stenodema laevigata
Green-veined white butterfly Pieris napi
Red admiral butterfly Vanessa atalanta
Hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus

This golf facility does not monitor any species as indicators of environmental quality.

Habitats & Designations

This golf facility features the following landscape designations:

Description Designating Authority
Lochore Meadows Country Park - encompassing Lochore Meadows Golf Course Fife Council
Lomond Hills Regional Park - encompassing Lochore Meadows Golf Course Fife Council
Built heritage: prehistoric henge monument at Dora Golf Course Historic Scotland

Area of habitats / vegetation types, and associated designations at this golf facility:

Title Estimated Area (Hectares) Designation
Rough 'ecological' grassland 70 Self Appointed
Scrub Vegetation 2 Self Appointed
Non Native Plantation Woodland 16 Self Appointed
Wetlands 0.5 Self Appointed
Open Water Features 1.5 Self Appointed

Turfgrass

Size and estimated species composition of amenity turfgrass maintained at this golf facility.

Estimated Area (Hectares) Turfgrass Species Sward Composition (%)
Greens 6.2 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 50%
Poa annua 50%
Tees 3.0 Hectares Lolium perenne 50%
Poa annua 50%
Fairways 131.2 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 80%
Poa annua 20%
Semi Rough 100.6 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 50%
Lolium perenne 50%

These turfgrasses are optimal for the circumstances at this club because:
Fine turf management is based on traditional greenkeeping methods promoting indigenous bent grasses.
Areation progammes are in place to improve surface drainage and deeper rooting which in time will
increase the population of finer grasses. Minimal watering and feeding programmes are also in place to achieve
this goal. Organic matter levels are checked on a yearly basis to accomadate an overseeding programme with
bent.

This golf facility assesses mowing patterns every: 1 months

This golf facility consults the following individuals / organizations regarding its grassing plan:

  • STRI

This golf facility is making the following efforts to manage the playing quality expectations of customers:

Activity Description
Establishing clear internal policies for irrigation, fertilization, colour, cutting heights, overseeding etc We have a course management policy dealing cultural methods to encourage finer grasses.

The levels of water applied are determined by a moiture meter proir to watering. Fertiliser is kept to a minimum starting with a base feed in the spring followed by a foliar programme throughout the growing season.
Nitrogen levels per hectare are closely monitored throughout the season with the view to minimise when possible.
Cutting hieghts are aimed at 4mm in the summer months with pace achieved through regular verti cutting, rolling and a growth retardant programme in place.
Promoting the playing quality values of more naturalized turf, particularly fairways and semi-rough Cutting regularly with precission machinery in addition to a aeration programme produces
fairways in a healthy and natural appearance. There are no fertiliser or fungicide applied to fairways or rough.
Promoting the financial benefits of presenting sustainable surfaces Savings are made through not applying unecessary applications of fertilisers and chemicals.
Improving customer understanding around greens maintenance We post regular updates on facebook as well as articles on notice boards for members and visitors highlighting the programmes of maintenance we do and benfits from it.
Demonstrating the direct relationship between environmental best practice and year round high quality playing surfaces High presentation on a daily basis showcases the course. With cultural programmes in place and using best practice in all areas of the course quality has improved.
Inclement weather can have an impact of presentation and quality but this is only in the short term.

Conservation & Enhancement

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve landscape character:

Activity Description
Allowing seasonal variation of course coloration and texture Dunnikier, Lochore Meadows and Glenrothes courses are situated within a wooded landscape, and this is celebrated both through sympathetic landscaping which take advantage of the character, as well as the walks which are maintained to encourage visitors to enjoy the woods through the seasons.
Appropriately matching mowing lines to contours Since the Fife Golf Trust has taken on municipal course management, the area of rough and semi-rough has been increased with consideration given to landscape and habitats, for instance by bringing areas of rough grassland into fairways near tees, around copses of trees, and on low-lying wet ground.
Protection and restoration of historic features A number of the courses such as Dunnikier and Kinghorn have drystone dykes and other stone features, which are preserved for their cultural heritage and character as well as their value as micro-habitats and hibernacula.
Discreet on-course signage and furniture The Fife Golf Trust uses wooden furniture with a natural appearance wherever possible. The organisation also prides itself in a trial initiated in partnership with Elmwood College at Glenrothes Golf Course using welcoming, dog walker-friendly signage to encourage responsible dog walking.
Conservation of specimen trees The organisation and its staff are aware of the particular importance of mature trees and dead standing and fallen trees for biodiversity. These trees and deadwood are protected wherever possible. Should limbs need to be removed for safety reasons, main trunks are left standing wherever possible.
Screening and softening unsightly man-made features There are no significant unslightly man-made features on the courses. That said, Fife Golf Trust is looking to work with the clubs to enhance the grounds around the clubhouses. A hedgerow and trees are currently being planted adjacent to a section of fence line at Dunnikier to soften this feature.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the landscape ecology of the golf course:

Activity Description
Minimizing the amount of amenity grass Since the Fife Golf Trust started managing the region's municipal courses, the area of grassland managed as fairway and for amenity has been greatly reduced. New areas of rough and semi-rough have been created and brought into management to add natural, more species-rich fringes to existing habitat.
Increasing the size of habitat patches The freshwater environment in particular has been greatly enhanced in the last few years through the creation of two new ponds and the deculverting of several sections of burn at three courses. The restored streams have naturally landscaped banks and swales, creating riparian and wetland habitat.
Connection of internal habitat patches Through biodiversity assessments undertaken in 2014, the Trust intends to improve connectivity of course habitat through hedgerow and copse creation. An application to Woodland Trust Scotland for a native fruiting and flowering hedge pack was successful and 420 trees were received.
Connection of patches with external habitats Fife's Biodiversity Co-ordinator made recommendations in 2014, making use of the Integrated Habitat Network model to help identify priorities in terms of enhancing wider habitat connectivity. Examples include plans to create an 800m section of hedgerow and treeline, and ponds as stepping stones.
Creation of habitat corridors The Trust has significantly improved a riparian corridor at Dunnikier Golf Course by deculverting c.625 m of ditch and creating a naturally-landscaped stream and bankings. Other smaller sections of burn were also deculverted at four further courses. Plans are underway to create new hedge corridors.
Avoidance of habitat fragmentation The Fife Golf Trust is committed to protecting and enhancing the habitats on its courses and improving the connectivity between these through habitat creation, and has signed up to these objectives in the Fife Local Biodiversity Action Plan and as a member of the Fife Biodiversity Partnership.
Improving and diversifying habitat edges In particular, the Trust has created: new grassland fringes around existing habitat to create natural gradation; newly landscaped bankings and swales along deculverted, restored sections of streams; and wildflower-rich margins at two newly created ponds at Dunnikier in partnership with Buglife.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the quality of habitats on the golf course:

Activity Description
Creation of botanically rich rough grassland Fife Golf Trust is a supporting partner of the Fife's Buzzing project - a three-year, grant-funded wildflower meadow creation initiative run by Buglife and Fife Council -and has created wildflower-rich grassland and pond margins with schoolchildren and volunteers at Dunnikier Golf Course.
Ecologically informed management of scrub vegetation Integrated Environment Management Plans were written for all courses between 2005 and 2008, and these make recommendations on scrub management where this habitat is present, such as diversifying the age structure of gorse and introducing additional species of fruiting and flowering native shrubs.
Promoting species and structurally diverse woodlands Fife Golf Trust is aware of the importance of deadwood in the woodland habitat and has created log piles and preserves standing and fallen deadwood where possible. A contractor has been appointed to survey the course woodlands with a view to creating a five-year management plan.
Establishment of littoral shelves and marginal vegetation in wetland areas Two new ponds were created at Dunnikier in 2013, both of which had shelves and shallow margins landscaped into edges. An area of wetland habitat was developed in 2014 adjacent to a ditch to create a natural floodplain area at Glenrothes. The Trust aims to widen the marginal shelves at Dora's pond.
Maintenance of an appropriate balance of open water and aquatic vegetation At present, all course ponds have a good balance of open water and vegetation. Auchterderran pond may need restoration work in the next few years and the Trust will take advice from Fife Amphibian & Reptile Group. Swales have been landscaped into restored burns to encourage vegetation to colonise.
Naturalization of linear habitats An application to Woodland Trust Scotland for a native fruiting and flowering shrub assortment has been successful and will be used to diversify gaps in a beech hedge at Scoonie Golf Course. The intention is to diversify hedgerows and treelines on all courses in terms of age and species structure.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve and enhance biodiversity on the golf course:

Activity Description
Provision of nesting and nectar for pollinators A supporting partner of Fife's Buzzing, a meadow creation project run by Buglife and Fife Council, Dunnikier Golf Course is one of 16 sites creating wildflower-rich habitat for pollinators and other wildlife. So far 2483 plugs have been planted with 78 children, 32 volunteers and 4 young trainees.
Installation of nest boxes None have yet been installed under Fife Golf Trust management, however the intention is to secure funding to create and install nest boxes with local schoolchildren and community groups.
Provision of feeding tables Fife Golf Trust aims to continually improve the quality and diversity of habitat on its courses so that these are rich in invertebrate life, thereby supporting birds, small mammals and amphibians. The intention is for the courses to naturally and sustainably support a range of wildlife, so that feeding tables are not required.
Control / management of alien species Environmental site visits have identified the presence of Rhododendron ponticum and grey squirrel. None of the courses are in proximity to key red squirrel sites for Fife, so are not within the grey squirrel control priority areas. Few-flowered leek will be controlled at Kinghorn Golf Course.
Provision of hibernation areas Log piles have been created as hibernacula for amphibians as well as habitat piles for other species. Fife Golf Trust hopes to install bat boxes at all of its courses, and will take advice from Fife & Kinross Bat Group on their situation.
Creation of micro-habitats (eg log and stone piles) Standing and fallen deadwood is left in situ wherever possible and log piles have also been created. There are stone features on a number of the courses including remains of drystone dykes, and these are protected as hibernacula and micro-habitats for invertebrates, small mammals and amphibians.

Water

As part of Fife Golf Trust's policy for the management of our golf courses, water minimisation while providing quality playing surfaces is key. At present the majority of our water is from mains/potable supply apart from Lochore Meadows and Scoonie which are from a surface water source. This water is used in th irrigation of the course and in the maintenance facility for washing machinery, product mixing and staff facilities. We have a policy of using minimum water to drive the quality of turf through using moisture readings data.The majority of our maintenance facility services are fitted with water saving devices. The efficiencies made along with identification and repair of leakage have resulted in an overall reduction of approx. 50% between 2014 and 2015.
The irrigations systems we have varies from 3 water supply to greens which reqiured a hose to connect to a sprikler or hand water. We have 4 automated system at the other courses. Kinghorn has valve in head sprinklers which are more efficent at targeting the specific irrigation needs for that links site.
FGT share many depots with Fife Council with only 1 meter supplying the yard. The figures given are the totals for the depots only. Going forward water meters have been installed at all the pump house to calculate water used on irrigation.

Sources & Consumption

The following water audits have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Glenrothes Golf Course: Sustainable Drainage Solutions for area north of the airport road (holes 1-10) Hole 18 Limited and GreenProgress 2010/07/01

The water used at this golf facility is drawn from the following sources:

2015 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 3,440,000 Litres
2014 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 6,874,000 Litres
2013 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 4,839,000 Litres

Irrigation & Efficiency

The following areas receive irrigation at this golf facility:

Greens Weekly
Tees Weekly
Fairways Never
Semi-Rough Never
Rough Never

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:
Semi-automatic

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:

Serviced every 1 years

Upgraded every 15 years

Re-calibrated and checked for efficient application every 1 years

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to maximize irrigation efficiency:

Activity Description
Selection of grass species We continue to encourage bent and fescue swards which are more drought tolerant and produce a deep rooting system.
Soil decompaction and thatch management FGT work closely with STRI and yearly testing is carried on organic matter levels. We strive to reduce levels through regular areation and top dressing in addition to scarify, coring and graden works.
Timing and dose of water application On the 4 courses that have automatic systems the application is through the night to optimise the water applied with dose determined by pogo moisture meter readings. we are looking to maintain 10% moisture. We have 3 courses that have stand pipes at the greens and these are hand watered during the day time.
Analysis of soil moisture FGT use a pogo moisture meter to monitor water requirerments. The meter accuratley measures the percentage of moisture within the soil profile. We have a treshold of 12% moisture inland and 9% links when we would apply irrigation.
Incorporation of evapotranspiration rates and weather data Record daily rainfall measures and closely monitor local weather forcasts when considering irrigation needs.
Use of wetting agents All 7 fgt courses are on a full programme of wetting agent to greens only.
Overall reduction in irrigated area Mainly water greens but in extreame circumstances we will water tees. Areas of greens are often hand watered to target high spots.
Targeting of sprinkler heads All sprinklers are regularly checked to ensure that the heads are targeting the required areas.
Optimizing system pressure Regular checking of manual system to improve efficiency of use and keeping water usage down to a minimum.
Adoption of cutting edge nozzle technology All new sprinklers fitted use manufacturer's approved nozzles.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve / reduce / minimize water consumption:

Activity Description
Low-flow urinals and toilets many of our toilets have low flow urinals installed
Use of water efficient appliances When upgrading appliances, their water and energy efficiency is taken into account as part of the purchasing process. We always aim to select the most efficient models and would prefer to pay more at point of purchase if savings can be made in the long term.
Use of efficient shower technology Many of the showers provided have thermostatically controlled with low-flow shower heads.
Repairing leaks All leaks are attended to immediately and irrigation system isolates problem areas
Water awareness signage All staff are instructed to save water when possible. Signs are in the restrooms to turn taps off after use.

Energy

FGT was set up as an arms length organisation with Fife Council when many budgets and responsibillities were transfered during this process.The budget for utilities such as electricity were retained by FC as many, but not all of our maintenance facilities are shared depots with FC staff.
Club houses at each of the courses are not included within the FGT submission as they are all privately owned.
All 7 fgt courses are located within a 4o mile radius. We have 2 vehicles which transport shared machinery, for example, areation and spraying equipment to all courses as well as tranporting all machinery to a central workshops for servicing and repairs.
To monitor course condition and staff supervision the courses manager drives between each site by car regularly throughout the course of the year.

Sources & Consumption

No energy surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility.

Consumption of renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2015 2014 2013
Biogas (Litres) 0 0 0
Biomass 0 0 0
First Generation Bio-Fuels (Litres) 0 0 0
Hydrogen (Litres) 0 0 0
On-site Hydro (kWh) 0 0 0
On-site Solar (kWh) 0 0 0
On-site Wind (kWh) 0 0 0
Renewable Grid Electricity (kWh) 0 0 0
Second Generation Bio-Fuels (Litres) 0 0 0
Wood from sustainable sources 0 0 0

Consumption of non-renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2015 2014 2013
Coal 0 0 0
Diesel (Litres) 56095 56500 57500
Heating Oil (Litres) 0 0 0
LPG (Litres) 0 0 0
Natural Gas (Litres) 0 0 0
Non-renewable Grid (kWh) 0 0 0
Petrol (Litres) 1886 1900 1950
Propane / Butane (Litres) 0 0 0

Energy Efficiency

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to diversify energy and fuel supply:

Activity Description
Adoption of green tariff grid supply N/A
Installation of small scale wind turbine Investigations into locating wind turbines took place at Kinghorn and Auchterderran but were deamed unsuitable sites.
Installation of photovoltaic and / or solar panels n/a
Use of geothermal and / or ground sources n/a
Use of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) n/a
Use of biodiesel and /or ethanol n/a
Use of electric hybrid vehicles All our 12 golf carts are electric. Each course has an electric utility vehicle.
Use of recycled oils All oils are changed at Fife Council workshops.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to reduce energy consumption:

Activity Description
Investment in low-energy heating and air conditioning systems Fife golf trust are not responsible for any of the clubhouses attached to the courses. We do however have 2 recently refurbished professional shops which have low energy lighting installed. At 3 other venues we has 3 starter hut which are very small and require little heating.
Optimizing thermostat levels for heating and refrigeration All heating installed within FGT facilities are regulated with a thermostat.
Enhancement of natural ventilation opportunities n/a
Upgrading of building insulation n/a
Use of natural light (e.g. sunlight pipes) n/a
Installation of low-energy lighting The new greens facilities at scoone have been installed with LED lights both indoor lighting and outdoor security lighting.
Use of motion sensor lighting Motion sensors have been installed at Scoonie maintenance sheds both indoor and outdoor.
Transition to energy efficient appliances FGT always strive to install the desired energy efficient appliances.
Use of timers with appliances, heating and lighting Timers are installed with all heating appliances
Educating staff and customers Staff are fully trained on the need to save energy.

Vehicles & Transport

The maintenance fleet at this golf facility uses the following fuel sources:

Ride-on Mowers Walking Mowers Utility Vehicles
Petrol 7% 100% 0%
Diesel 76% 0% 30%
LPG 0% 0% 0%
Grid Electric 17% 0% 70%
Micro Renewable 0% 0% 0%
Hybrid 0% 0% 0%
Hydrogen 0% 0% 0%

Additional vehicles operated by this golf facility use the following fuel sources:

Golf Carts Cars Buses
Diesel 100%
Grid Electric 100%

This golf facility has established the following schemes to encourage reductions in staff and customer transport emissions:

Activity Description
Car sharing incentives Staff are encouraged to car share where possible.
Group transportation (e.g. buses) FGT have small staff numbers spread over a large area which makes group transportation impracticle.
Secure cycle parking There is secure parking within the maintenance facility
Promoting public transport routes and timetables All our courses are on public transport routes. Many golfer use busses to play our courses.
Increasing equipment storage (e.g. lockers) Staff have access to personal locker storage at most FGT venues.
Staff showers We have staff showers at all our 7 facilities.
Tax breaking incentives for cycling Fife Council offer a discount bike inititive which is available to FGT employees.
Promotion of walk to work campaigns n/a

Supply Chain

FGT are responsible for all aspects of course maintenance at our 7 golf sites. The courses are situated within a 25 mile radius within central fife.
Supplies are bulk ordered for all courses to reduce deliveries where possible.
The majority of our fertiliser is applied as a foliar feed which reduces the quanity of product and storage required. Reducing rates of fertilisers and fungicides has had a benificial effect on reducing the amounts of materials required.
Good sustainable cultural practices are in place at all our venues.
Cores from areation works are reused on the course in construction works and grass clipping from greens are spread on weak areas. Any surplus timber from the woodland is stacked into log piles to aid hibernating animals and pond life within the woodlands.
All other waste streams generated from the maintenance facilities is managed according to best practice.

Purchasing Policies

This golf facility undertakes the following ethical / environmental purchasing activities:

Activity Description
Measures to avoid waste at source Materials are bulk ordered were possible to reduce transportation costs and lower our carbon footprint.
Use of local suppliers A limited number of local suppliers who have commitments in their own environmental policies. For the Fife's Buzzing project, a local plant supplier was used to procure the wildflowers.
Use of local products Local products are used whenever possible.
Selection of certified products All golf course materials such as sand, fertiliser, fungicides and insecticides are all certified products.
Use of recycled and recyclable products Use of recycled rubber mats to create natural looking grass paths through out the 7 courses. Wildflower plant trays are recycled after use.
Reclaimed astro turf has been recycled for paths and winter tees.PAS100 compost in divot mix??
Selection of products that feature minimal packaging Switched from 20kg bagged kiln-dried sand for graden work on the greens after scarifying to loose, silo-stored sand has avoided 1440 (18 x 80) plastic bags for disposal from each greens application. It has also considerably reduced sand wastage previously incurred through damage to bags. Costs have also reduced by 50%
Use of accredited suppliers (e.g. ISO 14001) Many of our suppliers are ISO 14001 accredited.

Supply Chain

An overview of the supplier network at this golf facility:

Total number of suppliers Total number of suppliers within 10 Kilometres Total number of suppliers within 100 Kilometres
Trade & Contractors 5 5
Maintenance Equipment 4 2 2
Course Supplies 6 1 5

Turfgrass Inputs

This golf facility undertakes the following IPM activities:

Activity Description
Encouraging drought and disease tolerant grasses Minimal use of water, fertilisers and chemicals whilst trying to achieve a healthy bent dominant sward through sound cultural management.
Managing stress and wear Good traffic management using hoops and ropes at appropriate times to rest heavily used areas. Using the turf iron on greens as an alternative to cutting to reduce stress. Avoid daily clean up cutts to greens. Removal of artificial paths and replaced with recycles rubber mats reduce wear and give the course anatural look.
Enhancement of soil structure Regular verti-draining, hollow coring and spiking to alleviate compaction and improve soil structure which improves drainage and air movement through the soil profile.
Air injection 2g2 machine used 4 times a year to add air to the structure and also deeper rooting.
Optimization of the growing environment Programmes are in place which optimize our growing environment. These include areation, top dressing, rolling, fertility and minimal water all based on sound cultural practices.
Managing thatch levels FGT work closely with STRI and yearly testing is carried on organic matter levels. We strive to reduce levels through regular areation and top dressing in addition to scarify, coring and graden works.
Managing surface moisture Surface moisture is removed by mower/roller or manually with a dewey brush/switch depending on the time of year.
Use of wetting agents monthly throughout growing season to reduce surface tension and aid water percolation through the profile.
Establishing thresholds for pests and disease The courses operate on the basis that chemical means of dealing with a pest or disease problem are the last line of defence. All cultural practices carried out before resorting to pesticides.
Scouting for pests and diseases Daily monitoring by greens staff who are trained to identify any outbreak.
Monitoring / improvement of plant health Daily monitoring by greens staff

Fertilizer use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2015 2014 2013
Fairways - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - K - Organic 0 0 0
Fairways - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - N - Organic 0 0 0
Fairways - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - P - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - K - Inorganic 137 140 137
Greens - N - Inorganic 79 74 66
Greens - N - Organic 39 34 32
Greens - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Greens - P - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0
Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0
Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - N - Inorganic 75 65 65
Tees - P - Inorganic 30 30 30

Pesticide use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2015 2014 2013
Fairways - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Fairways - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 40 39.6 38.8
Fairways - Herbicide - Total Weight 73 72 70
Fairways - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Fairways - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Fairways - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Fairways - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Greens - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 3.6 6.75 11.7
Greens - Fungicide - Total Weight 10.8 20.25 35.1
Greens - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0.8 1.5 2.6
Greens - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Greens - Insecticide - Total Weight 1.5 1.5 1.5
Greens - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Tees - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Tees - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Tees - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Tees - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0

This golf facility undertakes the following actions to optimize pesticide use:

Activity Description
Selection on the least toxic and lest persistent products Where ever possible we use the least toxic product at the lowest application rate.
Selection of appropriate products for specific pests and diseases Confirm the specific pests or disease and match this with the recommended product available.Always look to exhaust all cultural processes before application.
Spot-treatment with handheld sprayers and wipers Spot treatments on greens when possible to avoid unnessessary blanket spraying. Handheld spot treatment used on paths and weeds in roughs.
Calibration and testing of sprayers Sprayers calibrated and tested every year. Nozzles replaced when worn.
Use of shrouded sprayer and anti-drip nozzles Shrouds and anti drip nozzles are used. Our designated sprayer is transported around all 7 courses throughout the season.
Non-chemical weed control Hand weeding is still an ongoing task in bunkers, ditches.
Scarification and thinning of grasslands to promote finer grasses and reduce coarser weed species.
Tree thinning to encourage natural re generation.
Use of organic and biological products to improve plant health and resistance. Organic supplements are included in our fertilty programmes which include - seaweeds, soil conditioners, amino acids, fulvic acid and humic acid.

Waste Management

No waste audits have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility manages key waste streams as follows:

Re-use Recycle Landfill Incinerate
Glass false false false false
Plastic false false false false
Aluminium false true false false
Metal false true false false
Paper & Cardboard false true false false
Grass Clippings true false false false
Cores & Turf true false false false
Sand true false false false
Wood / Timber true false false false

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to continue the lifecycle of materials and resources:

Activity Description
Separation of recyclable materials The office and professional shops separate recyclable materials at source.
Establishment of recycling centers As a future project we hope to locate recycling centers at each of our 7 courses for public use as well as fgt's.
Returning clipping to fairways and walkways Clippings are only boxed on greens. On all other areas they are returned with the exception of long rough where we cut and collect in an effort to reduce fertility.
Education of staff and customer education All staff are college trained and trained on site in an ongoing programme. Additional courses are used for further training as legislation dictates.
Waste awareness campaigns Fife council have a zero to landfill policy by 2020 that we are working towards.

Pollution Control

Fife golf trust works hard to ensure that precautions are taken to avoid air, land and water pollution in relation to work carried out on all 7 courses. Legal compliance in this regards represents the minimum standard we work to.
Sustainable turfgrass practices limit environmental risks and pressures on our course. We do not use chemicals of any description near to water bodies on the courses.
We are also endeavouring to reduce our carbon footprint through improved energy management.
We are conscious of light pollution and use low energy lighting as often as is practical internally and externally most of which is operated by sensor or timer, the latter mostly for security. Water quality monitoring takes place at Auchterderren due to proximity of old mine works as part of a wider area initiative. We intend to start biological monitoring at some of our golf course watercourses in the next year.

Water Analysis

This golf facility monitors water quality with the following frequency:

Chemical Biological Visual
Inflow Never Never Daily
On-Site Never Never Daily
Outflow Never Never Daily

Waste Water

Waste water from this golf facility is managed as follows:

Discharges to Formal Discharge Agreement
Golf Course Mains Sewer N/A
Clubhouse Mains Sewer N/A
Maintenance Facility Mains Sewer N/A
Wash Pad Mains Sewer N/A

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials at this golf facility are handled and disposed of as follows:

Secure Storage Registered Uplift
Detergents true false
Cooking Oils false false
Lubricants true true
Pesticide Containers true false
Fertiliser Bags true false
Oil Filters true true
Batteries true true

Pollution Prevention

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution from its maintenance facility and clubhouse:

Activity Description
Storage of equipment and hazardous products on covered, sealed impervious areas All equipment and hazardous products are stored within the maintenance shed which is a fully bunded, concrete-floored building which is kept locked at all times when unoccupied. Chemicals and pesticides are held within a secure chemstore within the maintenance shed.
Maintenance of equipment on covered, sealed impervious areas All servicing is carried out by fife councils trained engineers within a purpose-built, H&S compliant workshop.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers in covered areas Pesticides and fertlisers are always mixed in a controlled manner within a safe area within the sheds.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers over impervious surfaces Pesticides and fertlisers are always mixed in a controlled manner within a safe area within the sheds.
Installation of above-ground fuel tanks Above-ground secure, double-skinned and bunded storage tanks for diesel. Petrol stored in an approved separate secure unit.
Installation of sufficient secondary containment for fuel The diesel fuel store is a legally compliant, double-skinned tank designed to contain any ruptures within the tank. Petrol is stored in jerry cans which are stored in a sealed container, inside a secured unit.
Provision of containment booms and absorbent materials Emergency spill containment materials are situated around the maintenance facility and all staff are trained to use it.

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution on its golf course:

Activity Description
Eliminating leachate and run-off through careful timing of turf inputs All inputs are applied with optimum timing and under appropriate climatic and environmental conditions.Constant monitoring of weather forecasts and use of the most advanced nozzles available on our sprayer.
Establishment of vegetative buffer strips around water bodies No spray zones apply around all water bodies, ditches and watercourses.
Establishment of emergency spillage response plan Spillage materials are available and all greenstaff are fully trained in their correct use.
Controlling erosion and sediment discharge At Dunnikier golf course there has been the creation of swales and watercourses to reduce erosion and sedimentation. There is a sustainable drainage system in place at Glenrothes to manage surface water runoff and erosion.
Establishment of pesticide-free zones Fairways, tees,and approaches are spot treated with pesticides all other areas on the courses are pesticide free zones.
Use of swales and bio-filters to slow and treat surface run-off Swales and suds are in place at Glenrothes to slow down and treat surface run off at the 1st fairway.

Community

Fife Golf Trust maintain 7 golf courses throughout fife. Each course has a private members club attached to the course. All the clubs have an open policy with regards to access to the public.
As FGT are a registared charity the pricing policy endeavours to reflect the locations of the courses, encouraging people in the community with low income access to golf.
Various charity event are held on our courses from national to local causes which involve many groups from the local community.
Access to school and local conservation groups are encouraged on all our courses.

Employment & Education

Typical staffing levels at this golf facility are:

Full Time Part Time Seasonal
Course Management 21 5
Golf Coaching 5
Other 6

The sustainability working group at this golf facility is comprised of:

  • Course Manager
  • Technical Specialist
  • Local Government
  • Local Environment NGO

Employees at this golf facility receive the following formal and informal environmental education:

Activity Description
Storage, application and disposal of pesticides Course staff are trained in all areas relating to chemical safety and awareness. PPE is provided for all staff as is safe handling training. Training on application and safe disposal is provided.
Efficient water management All staff trained in-house in efficient irrigation usage.
Management of accidents and emergencies All staff are trained in how to deal with emergencies ranging from fire drills to oil spills. Formal spill training has been completed by all key personnel on site. 21 members of staff are trained in the use of defibrillators. 4 members of staff are qualified first aiders.
Management of habitats and vegetation Greens staff have been a big part in maintaining all the habitats and vegetation within their course. Ongoing inhouse training ensures that we are successfull in our objectives.
Waste minimization, separation and recycling Within the office all seperation and recycling is carried our. The waste generated from the course is all mixed and is not recycled. A future objective if to install recycling bins at each course.
Health & Safety We work closely with Fife Council and have a health and safety plan which is reviewed regularly.
Staff trained in safe use of machinery, equipment and products. Relevant staff trained in manual lifting. Regular medicals for key staff. Staff expected to comply with health and safety legislation.
Energy Saving Verbal communications regarding switching off lights, taps, good housekeeping etc maintains good practice by staff.
Understanding of landscape and cultural heritage Reports and consultation with STRI and SGEGa and hole 18 have assisted with landscape understanding. Culturally, staff are aware of the diversity and anomalies peculiar to this area and the impact on the landscape and ground.
Environmental management planning All greenstaff involved in Sustainable Golf Programme.

Community Relations

This golf facility engages with local community groups in the following manner:

Activity Description
Neighbours At Dunnikier Golf Course, pupils from Capshard and St Marie's Primary Schools, Kirkcaldy High School, volunteers from Dunnikier Park Development Group who help look after the public park next door, and charity Greener Kirkcaldy volunteers helped create wildflower meadows and enhance pond margins.
Local Government Fife Golf Trust approached Fife Council's biodiversity team in 2012, and have since committed in the Fife Local Biodiversity Action Plan 2013-2018 to enhancing its courses for biodiversity, jointly undertaking biodiversity-specific site visits in 2014.
Local Environmental Groups By being a member of the Fife Biodiversity Partnership and of the Fife's Buzzing Steering Group, Fife Golf Trust has worked in partnership with charities including Buglife and had support from Greener Kirkcaldy, and is looking to create hedgerows in partnership with the Fife & Kinross Bat Group.
Local Community Groups Dunnikier Park Development Group have also been regularly involved in wildflower meadow creation and were recently consulted on tree planting at Dunnikier Golf Course.
Media Maintenance activities are listed on Fife Golf Trust's website and Facebook page to give prior notice of environmental practices, reports, distruptions, etc, as well as advertise events such as wildflower planting at Dunnikier. Fife's Buzzing has had numerous articles in the press since 2014.
Local Businesses Local businesses are a strong partner at Dunnikier through course tee sponsorship. The joint venture between Dunnikier Golf Club and FGT purchased new tee signs and worked closely together to encourage local businesses to take advertising space on the tees. After year 2 the cost of the signs are met and the money that comes in from our sponsors is profit, which is invested back into the course. FGT hope to use this model at our other 6 venues in the coming years.
Schools & Colleges Through the Fife's Buzzing wildflower meadow creation project, the Trust has engaged Capshard and St Marie's Primary Schools and Kirkcaldy High School in wildflower planting at Dunnikier in the last year. Through Elmwood College, a student undertook a dissertation project on dog and access issues.

Land Use & Cultural Heritage

This golf facility provides access and diversified land use for others through:

Activity Description
Maintenance of existing public paths Yearly maintenance of rights of way and core path routes throughout golf courses are maintained by Fife Council.
Creation of new paths and nature trails In accordance with access regulations, pathways throughout the golf courses have been created to facilitate dog walkers to ensure their safe passage across the golf courses.
Installation of effective and welcoming signage All Fife Golf Trust courses have informational and welcoming signage throughout the sites. A student with Elmwood College worked on a dissertation project to explore ways to address dog issues on courses, and included development of positive signage. A Fife's Buzzing sign is in place at Dunnikier.
Providing opportunities for other recreation (e.g. fishing) n/a
Partnership conservation and access projects (e.g. community woodland) Fife Golf Trust is working as a partner landowner in the Fife's Buzzing wildflower meadow creation project, led by Fife Council and Buglife. This project aims to create habitat as well as diversifying greenspaces for people, and has welcomed groups and schools onto the course for practical events.
Continuation of traditional agricultural activities FGT has farms boardering on three of its courses. We work closely together on access issues as well as repairs to shared demarcation lines which includes maintaining hedges and dry stone walls.

The following archaeological and heritage surveys have been carried out at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Cultural Heritage Information for Fife Golf Trust Courses Various - Fife Council and SGEG 2016/11/03 Download

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding the conservation of cultural heritage:

  • Historic Environment Scotland (pastmaps website)

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to conserve cultural heritage features:

Activity Description
Buildings (Listed Buildings / Ancient Monuments etc) n/a
Archaeology (Settlements / Agricultural System etc) Lumphinnans Bronze Henge at Dora golf course is a Scheduled Ancient Monument (SAM). This area is excluded from turf management practices to protect it.
Historic Features (Hedgerows / Dykes / Moats / Cairns etc) Hedgerows and dry stone dykes are valued features of the courses. Some hedges are ear-marked for enhancement by filling in gaps and diversifying with native fruiting and flowering species. An application to Woodland Trust Scotland for 420 shrubs was successful earlier this year.

Communications

This golf facility undertakes the following internal environmental communications:

Activity Description
Provision of newsletters, notice boards & poster display Posters were used on noticeboards in club houses and course entrances to advertise wildflower planting events at Dunnikier, which were open to the public and club members.
Members evenings and course walks Fife Golf Trust has given presentations at member evenings which include powerpoint to an audience of over 100 members in many cases. These presentations highlight fgt's plans for the future for the courses and explains what we are trying to achieve through our enviromental style of management.
Course guides / brochures It is a future plan to create a course guide which highlights wildlife to be found at each course as well as listing habitats and good processes in place to encourage environmentally sound management.
Interpretation panels & course signage Two Fife's Buzzing signs were installed at newly-created wildflower meadow areas at Dunnikier Golf Course to raise awareness about this habitat creation project and enable course users to find out more about the initiative.
There is an information sign at lochore meadows at the 1st tee with the heading woods in the woods. This informs the public of the histoy of the site, the future plans as well as the habitats and plants within.
Establishment of a nature trail Public are entitled to walk the course using the Outdoor Access Code as a guide to safety, but there are no nature trails specifically laid out.

This golf facility undertakes the following social and environmental advocacy activities:

Activity Description
Website, press releases & brochures In 2013 The R&A produced an online case study titled Scottish course digs deep to improve drainage. This highlighted good practice on the construction of open ditches at Dunnikier Golf Course. Fife's Buzzing was highlighted in a publication celebrating 20 years of biodiversity partnerships.
Supporting campaigns As an active partner of the Fife's Buzzing project, Fife Golf Trust is supporting and advocating the Get Britain Buzzing campaign to save and secure the UK's pollinator populations.
Course walks / open days Local residents as well as members of the Dunnikier Park Development Group regularly use the woodland walk following the periphery of Dunnikier Golf Course. Glenrothes also had a well-used woodland trail on the south side of the course.
Through the Fife's Buzzing project, publicly-advertised, open wildflower planting days have been advertised.
Attending community meetings Interaction with clubs
Fife Golf Trust is a member and participating land manager of the Fife's Buzzing Steering Group, which meets biannually.
Joint practical projects with community Fife Golf Trust is a supporting partner of a community-based wildflower meadow conservation project run by Buglife and Fife Council, and Dunnikier is one of 16 sites taking part. Local schoolchildren, community group volunteers and young trainees have helped plant wildflowers and sow seed.