Prince's Golf Club

GEO Certified® 03/2016
Kent,
England, United Kingdom
Telephone: 01304 611118
Image005_club_image

Prince's Golf Club is situated in Sandwich Bay, Kent on a section of coastline that is also home to Royal St George's and Royal Cinque Ports Golf Club.

The Club was originally established in 1906 and over the 110 year history the course has hosted Professional and Amateur tournament as well as the British Army during the Second World War. During this period the course was used as a live firing range, and to this day live munitions occasionally still appear during excavation and course maintenance.

The course was eventually reinst…

Tony Hanson, GEOSA, Accredited Verifier Read verifier report.

GEO Certified® Report

GEO Certified® is the symbol of great golf environments worldwide – designating that a golf facility has met a credible standard in the areas of nature, water, energy, supply chain, pollution control, and community, and is committed to continually improve. GEO Certified® is widely trusted and endorsed by a growing number of organizations and people, both inside and outside golf.

Click below to read about the activities undertaken by this golf facility to operate sustainably.

Facility details

Golf Courses
Prince's Golf Club (27 holes, 10680 yards, year opened 1906)
1 Clubhouse(s)
1 Maintenance Facility/Facilities
3 Other

Nature

Princes Golf Club is located within a coastal sand dune system situated along the South East coast of England, known as Sandwich Bay. The entire course has numerous environmental designations, which include: Site of Special Scientific Interest, and a Special Area of Conservation, due to the presence of rare annex one habitats (White and Grey dunes), and associated flora found predominantly
at this single site, such as Himantoglossum hircinum (lizard orchid) and Orobanche caryophyllacea (bedstraw broomrape). The golf course also resides within close proximity to Pegwell Bay National Nature Reserve, Special Protection Areas and a designated RAMSAR site.

Consultation & Surveys

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding landscape heritage conservation:

  • Natural England
  • Kent Wildlife
  • Sports Turf Research Institute
  • Canterbury Christ Church University

The following landscape assessments and surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Historical review of land use changes on Sandwich Bay dunes, Kent Henderson, A. 1986/07/01
Botanical Survey of Route for New Sea Defence Works at Sandwich Bay, Kent Henderson, K.L. 1986/08/01
Sand Dune Survey of Great Britain. Site Report No. 76: Sandwich Bay, Kent Doarks, C., Hedley, S.M., Radley, G.P. & Woolven, S.C. 1990/01/01
National Vegetation Classification Survey of Sand Dunes at Sandwich Bay Kent Dargie, T. C. D. 2002/01/01
National Vegetation Classification Survey of Sand Dunes at Sandwich Bay Kent: Repeat Survey of Royal St George’s Golf Club Dargie, T. C. D. 2009/01/01
Interpreting sand dune habitat change at Sandwich Bay using sequential NVC survey Earl, G. C. J. and Dargie, T. C. D. 2013/09/09
Eco-hydrological interactions within a sand dune system in South East England Earl, G. C. J. 2015/03/01
A Study in the Land Use Pattern and Scientific Importance of the Stour Estuary: Site of Special Scientific Interest Douthwaite, R.J. 1967/06/01

This golf facility consults the following organizations regarding ecosystem protection and enhancement:

  • Natural England
  • STRI
  • Kent Wildlife Trust
  • Canterbury Christ Church University

The following ecological surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility:

Title Author Date View document
Eco-hydrological interactions within a sand dune system in South East England Graham Earl 2015/03/01
Orchid Report (Annual) Kent Wildlife Trust - Tony Swandale 2014/07/01

Rare, protected and notable species occurring at this golf facility:

Local name Scientific name
Southern Marsh Orchid Dactylorhiza praetermissa
Lizard Orchid Himantoglossum hircinum
Bedstraw Broomrape Orobanche caryophyllacea
Sand Catchfly Silene conica
Green-winged Orchid Anacamptis morio
Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis
Bright Wave Moth Idaea ochrata

This golf facility regularly monitors the following species as indicators of environmental quality:

Local name Scientific name
Southern Marsh Orchid Dactylorhiza praetermissa
Lizard Orchid Himantoglossum hircinum
Bedstraw Broomrape Orobanche caryophyllacea
Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis
Sand Sedge Carex arenaria
Sweet Vernal Grass Anthoxanthum odoratum
Lichen Cladonia rangiformis
Tall Fescue Schedonorus arundinaceus
Red Fescue Festuca rubra
Lady's Bedstraw Galium verum
Annual Meadow-grass Poa annua

Habitats & Designations

This golf facility features the following landscape designations:

Description Designating Authority
SSSI Natural England
Special Areas of Conservation Natural England
RAMSAR Site Natural England
Special Protection Area Natural England

Area of habitats / vegetation types, and associated designations at this golf facility:

Title Estimated Area (Hectares) Designation
Sand dunes 135 International
Open Water Features 0.15 National Government
Rough 'ecological' grassland 100 National Government
Wetlands 0.20 Self Appointed
Non Native Plantation Woodland 6.58 Self Appointed

Turfgrass

Size and estimated species composition of amenity turfgrass maintained at this golf facility.

Estimated Area (Hectares) Turfgrass Species Sward Composition (%)
Greens 2.0 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 50%
Festuca rubra 50%
Tees 1.2 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 50%
Festuca rubra 50%
Fairways 17.1 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 50%
Festuca rubra 50%
Semi Rough 6.0 Hectares Agrostis tenuis / capillaris 50%
Festuca rubra 50%

These turfgrasses are optimal for the circumstances at this club because:
The course is actively encouraging native species, particularly the finer grasses such as Festuca rubra, by maintaining a strict watering regime, reduction in the thatch depth, silting and topdressing. All of these management techniques promote a firm stable playing surface, and discourage competitive broad leaf swards such as Poa annua and other invasive unwanted species within the areas in and out of play.

This golf facility assesses mowing patterns every: Every Day months

This golf facility consults the following individuals / organizations regarding its grassing plan:

  • Sports Turf Research Institute
  • Natural England

This golf facility is making the following efforts to manage the playing quality expectations of customers:

Activity Description
Establishing clear internal policies for irrigation, fertilization, colour, cutting heights, overseeding etc Use of moisture meters and weather station data are used to inform real time revision of watering regime. Minimal use of fertilisers applied, low nitrogen targets set and reduced where possible. Cutting heights are restricted to 4mm, to ensure the preservation of native fescues in areas of play. Over-seeding undertaken on an as-needed-basis. Colour definition is not an important factor on a links course.
Promoting the playing quality values of more naturalized turf, particularly fairways and semi-rough Promotion of firmer fast running fairways with a good covering of native fescue grasses. Semi rough managed to a consistent height of cut, to ensure naturalised margins encouraging natural regeneration of the existing seed bank. Cultivated on-site turf is used where possible, reducing the amount of imported turf used on the course.
Promoting the financial benefits of presenting sustainable surfaces Reduced energy consumption by selective mowing of all playing areas, including areas out of play. In situ native swards used where possible, to reduce the expenditure of bought in turf. Reactive management of turf inputs, reduces chemical and water resource wastage.
Improving customer understanding around greens maintenance The club promotes a transparency policy with regards to areas both in and out of play. Monthly newsletter to members informs and educates them of the greens maintenance, and guests are contacted well in advance of any course works.
Demonstrating the direct relationship between environmental best practice and year round high quality playing surfaces The club promotes research informed management. Collaboration with Canterbury Christ Church University, STRI and Natural England, has allowed for ground level management revision of the amenity and natural areas. Promotion of finer native grasses, allows for a consistent year round playing surface, reduction of energy input, thus ensuring best environmental best practice and high quality playing surfaces.
Eco-hydrological interactions within a sand dune system in South East England Areas of focus include: hydro-chemical analysis of the groundwater;
management trials of various management techniques; cartographic
analysis of the chemical and vegetation dynamics; detailed analysis of
vegetation species compositions.
Has led to informed best environmental practice at Princes GC

Conservation & Enhancement

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve landscape character:

Activity Description
Allowing seasonal variation of course coloration and texture Reduce definition of the playing surfaces by a careful watering regime, for
example hand watering greens during the summer. Promoting natural fescue regeneration and reducing general competitive swards such as Poa annual.
Appropriately matching mowing lines to contours A detailed management regime, ensures that the contours of the golf course,
are evenly matched, mowing lines are not a priority for presentation of a links courses.
Protection and restoration of historic features The dune systems at Princes are mobile therefore there are no historic features in the landscape apart from the buildings. We renovate bunkers in keeping with historic links design.
Discreet on-course signage and furniture Signage of the course is kept to a minimum. We endeavor to have as little on course furniture as possible.
Conservation of specimen trees There are limited trees on the course, which are maintained sympathetically
where necessary, to conserving landscape character, there are no indigenous trees on site.
Screening and softening unsightly man-made features Plan to reallocate native plants (Foeniculum vulgare, wild fennel) on site to
naturally screen junction boxes. Soft landscaping of scrub areas to encourage open
habitats of small mammals and invertebrates.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the landscape ecology of the golf course:

Activity Description
Minimizing the amount of amenity grass A programme of approved selective herbicide ('rescue') has been adopted to discourage the growth of competitive broad leaf species. Cut and collect of areas out of play to reduce the coarse grasses. Playing surface are reduced in size where possible and left to grow as natural roughs.
Increasing the size of habitat patches All rough areas are unmanaged and left as habitat areas. Winter management to trial controlled burning of sward thatch, thus allowing for rejuvenation and diversity of isolated patches in-between playing areas.
Connection of internal habitat patches There is a reduced degree of fragmentation between the managed areas and
semi-natural/natural areas. Course design allows for green corridors.
Connection of patches with external habitats Course design allows connectively between playing areas, acting like a green
corridor.
Creation of habitat corridors Course design allows connectively between playing areas, acting like a green
corridor.
Avoidance of habitat fragmentation A careful mowing regime means that there is a consistent depth of sward in the semi-rough, avoiding habitat fragmentation where possible.
Improving and diversifying habitat edges Research led observation into sward species dynamics has lead to the promotion of indigenousness flora and fauna, on site via differing management techniques, improving these the diversity of habitats by annual cutting and bailing and ditch management.
Eco-hydrological interactions within a sand dune system in South East England Areas of focus include: hydro-chemical analysis of the groundwater;
management trials of various management techniques; cartographic analysis of
the chemical and vegetation dynamics; detailed analysis of vegetation species
compositions.
Promoted management enhancement at Princes GC

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to improve the quality of habitats on the golf course:

Activity Description
Creation of botanically rich rough grassland Management trials on accepted dune grassland techniques, quantifying management and energy expenditure have been trialled. For Princes GC, bi-annual burning and cut and remove regimes have proven to promote native species. Princes have historically annually cut and bailed, crating diverse grasses.
Ecologically informed management of scrub vegetation Survey led assessments of flora and fauna, before invasive management is
undertaken. Where possible we remove scrub vegetation to encourage the natural dune status.
Promoting species and structurally diverse woodlands Annual revision of management regimes linked to vegetation surveys to promote Annex 1 endangered species regeneration. Small wooded areas on the site are left unmanaged for wildlife and particularly migrating birds.
Establishment of littoral shelves and marginal vegetation in wetland areas 6th Himalayas course re-development with guidance from Natural England, has crated new scrape areas on the course, these areas are left to encourage indigenous species and only managed if needed.
Maintenance of an appropriate balance of open water and aquatic vegetation Monitoring of ditches for invasive non-native species, for example Crassula helmsii (New Zealand Pygmy Weed). Ditch management is on a rotation and/or as needed regime, with monthly observations.
Naturalization of linear habitats Natural undulation of the course means that the semi-natural/natural areas,
fragment automatically based upon sediment composition, nutrient and/or
water retention. Creating a natural mosaic of habitats across the course.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve and enhance biodiversity on the golf course:

Activity Description
Provision of nesting and nectar for pollinators There is a wealth of herb flora available and promoted on site by the management regimes. There is also excavated sand piles at the back of the 6th Himalayas that acts like as a beetle bank/invertebrates habitat. Log piles are also situated throughout the course.
Installation of nest boxes Princes currently have nest boxes that are used by barn owls and a box for a hawk. There is a provision to add more nesting boxes in the next few years.
Provision of feeding tables We do not provide feeding tables. There are provisions for natural feeding stations via log piles, for example.
Control / management of alien species Manual and chemical control of invasive plant species, for example weed
wiping using Glyphosate and manual lifting of troublesome or invasive
plants.
Provision of hibernation areas Compost area is an unofficial hibernation area, with established regime of low disturbance between September - March. Log piles are as not disturbed.
Creation of micro-habitats (eg log and stone piles) Sand piles at the 6th Himalayas and log piles throughout the course are propose built micro-habitats.

Water

The Clubhouse and workshop water is drawn from a metered mains supply. Water for irrigation purposes on the course is drawn from the North Stream, a tributary of the River Stour. Course irrigation is supplemented via our own reservoir which can store 37,000 cubic meters. This reservoir is filled using natural rain water and extraction from the River Stour. In addition brown and grey water from the club house and hotel is collected and treated on site, the recycled water is then used on the course.

Sources & Consumption

No water audits have been undertaken at this golf facility.

The water used at this golf facility is drawn from the following sources:

2014 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 4,309 Cubic Metres
Golf Course Groundwater 100% 19,640 Cubic Metres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres
Other Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres
2013 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 4,480 Cubic Metres
Golf Course Groundwater 100% 22,565 Cubic Metres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres
Other Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres
2012 Source(s) % of supply Total Consumption
Clubhouse(s) Public / Potable 100% 4,881 Cubic Metres
Golf Course Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres
Maintenance Facility/Facilities Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres
Other Public / Potable 0% 0 Cubic Metres

Irrigation & Efficiency

The following areas receive irrigation at this golf facility:

Greens Daily in season
Tees 2-3 days per week
Fairways 2-3 days per week
Other 2-3 days per week
Rough Never

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:
Fully computer controlled

The irrigation system at this golf facility is:

Serviced every 1 years

Upgraded every 1 years

Re-calibrated and checked for efficient application every 1 years

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to maximize irrigation efficiency:

Activity Description
Selection of grass species Fescue grass species are native to the environment that the golf course is
situated on. Course management actively promotes the regeneration of fescues
due to their drought resistance, reducing water consumption and energy
expenditure.
Soil decompaction and thatch management Course management regime, focuses upon a reduction in moisture content and
ground compaction by a regular regime management, incorporating solid tine continually over all playing surfaces, and top dressing
with sand. For thatch management there is a cut and remove regime on playing and rough areas.
Timing and dose of water application Irrigation is applied when needed, and at specific times of the day (dusk) to reduce the amount of evapotranspiration. Hand watering is done on an as needed basis, potentially at any time during the day. The amount of water applied is heavier and more infrequent to encourage deeper rooted grasses.
Analysis of soil moisture Soil moisture is analysed on a regular basis, and watering is based upon moisture
percentages specific to environmental conditions and playing surface. Minimising
water wastage and reassessment of watering rates based upon meteorological
and seasonal variation. The STRI also take moisture measurements quarterly.
Incorporation of evapotranspiration rates and weather data On site weather station data, which is linked to our irrigation system, leads to informed decision making and real time revision of watering regime. Evapotranspiration rates are taken into consideration to the irrigation schedule and are adjusted to seasonal variability and meteorological conditions.
Use of wetting agents Revolution a wetting agent is used as a moisture management tool which reduces course water usage significantly and is used as part of our watering policy, and regulated on a constant basis.
Overall reduction in irrigated area By using the above products and information we have potentially reduced our water usage by 50%.
Targeting of sprinkler heads The course has a number of broadcast range sprinklers as a part of the irrigation system, all sprinkler heads are used effectively to target playing surfaces only. 180 degree sprinkler heads used to particular effect to target playing surfaces in confined areas.
Optimizing system pressure The irrigation system is monitored regularly as part of the course management regime and serviced annually to optimise pressure.
Adoption of cutting edge nozzle technology The course is continually updating sprinkler heads, which incorporates on going research into nozzle effectiveness and supplier recommendations.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to conserve / reduce / minimize water consumption:

Activity Description
Low-flow urinals and toilets Urinals are on an automated system in the club house and low flow urinals in the Lodge. All the toilets on the course have been adapted to have a reduced flush rate, reducing water consumption.
Use of water efficient appliances All facilities have new appliances, when required, with A+ rating for energy and water
consumption rates were possible.
Use of efficient shower technology All facilities, that have been refurbished and applicable, have efficient shower
technology. For example, the Lodge hotel accommodation and in the changing rooms in the main club house.
Repairing leaks Constant monitoring of water rate usage as a part of the clubs water policy. All staff are encouraged to be observant, both on and off the course of any water leaks.
Water awareness signage No

Energy

The club uses a mixture of resources in and off areas of play. The club house and Lodge hotel are powered by mains gas and electricity. The workshops are on main electricity, and have portable gas sources for equipment repair and service. The course green keeping machinery is powered by petrol and diesel fuels. Golf buggies have rechargeable batteries. The Lodge has a recycling facility that treats brown and grey water, which can then be used for course irrigation.

Sources & Consumption

No energy surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility.

Consumption of renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2014 2013 2012
Biogas (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Biomass 0 0 0
First Generation Bio-Fuels (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Hydrogen (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
On-site Hydro (kWh) 0 0 0
On-site Solar (kWh) 0 0 0
On-site Wind (kWh) 0 0 0
Renewable Grid Electricity (kWh) 0 0 0
Second Generation Bio-Fuels (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Wood from sustainable sources 2 2 2

Consumption of non-renewable energy and resources at this golf facility:

2014 2013 2012
Coal 0 0 0
Diesel (Cubic Metres) 21 20 22
Heating Oil (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Hydraulic Oil (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Natural Gas (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Non-renewable Grid (kWh) 576000 526000 431000
Petrol (Cubic Metres) 1.5 1.7 1.5
Propane / Butane (Cubic Metres) 0 0 0
Wood from unsustainable sources 1 1 1

Energy Efficiency

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to diversify energy and fuel supply:

Activity Description
Adoption of green tariff grid supply Not adopted
Installation of small scale wind turbine No
Installation of photovoltaic and / or solar panels No
Use of geothermal and / or ground sources N/A
Use of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) The main club house is run on LPG
Use of biodiesel and /or ethanol Not on site, but waste contractors recycle food grade cooking oil for
biodiesel production.
Use of electric hybrid vehicles Not currently, but future replacement of existing golf buggies with photovoltaic buggy technology can be investigated.
Use of recycled oils Not currently.

This golf facility is undertaking the following activities to reduce energy consumption:

Activity Description
Investment in low-energy heating and air conditioning systems The Lodge hotel design incorporates efficient modern boilers. The main club house's heating system is to be updated when needed, to reduce the amount of energy consumption.
Optimizing thermostat levels for heating and refrigeration Checked regularly by staff for optimum efficiency and serviced at regular intervals.
Enhancement of natural ventilation opportunities The club house and Lodge has in-situ ventilation panels installed in the kitchen areas and air bricks installed in the structure of the buildings. All buildings have an element of stack and wind-induced ventilation promoting natural ventilation.
Upgrading of building insulation The Lodge is a new development and conforms above modern building regulations. The main club house is in a constance flux of refurbishment when needed and has double glazing throughout.
Use of natural light (e.g. sunlight pipes) Not currently installed as building design incorporates the passage of natural light by careful planning and use of numerous glass panel doors in the Lodge and club house.
Installation of low-energy lighting As a part of the clubs policy, low energy lighting is installed thoughout the club house and Lodge, the outer buildings lighting is being upgraded when necessary. Security lighting has also been upgraded to low voltage SMD LEDs units.
Use of motion sensor lighting Lodge toilets. All security lights have PIR motion sensors, corrected for low light levels, and checked regularly.
Transition to energy efficient appliances All replacement appliances purchased are A+ energy rated, where possible.
Use of timers with appliances, heating and lighting All appliances are turned on as needed, and the boilers are on thermostatically
controlled time switches. All exterior lighting in on a PIR timer system.
Educating staff and customers The club management has a responsibility to ensure all staff are energy aware and
efficient. Staff are also encouraged to contribute energy saving ideas where possible.

Vehicles & Transport

The maintenance fleet at this golf facility uses the following fuel sources:

Ride-on Mowers Walking Mowers Utility Vehicles
Petrol 0% 0% 33%
Diesel 100% 0% 67%
LPG 0% 0% 0%
Grid Electric 0% 0% 0%
Micro Renewable 0% 0% 0%
Hybrid 0% 0% 0%
Hydrogen 0% 0% 0%

Additional vehicles operated by this golf facility use the following fuel sources:

Golf Carts Cars Buses
Petrol 9% 0% 0%
Diesel 0% 100% 100%
LPG 0% 0% 0%
Grid Electric 91% 0% 0%
Micro Renewable 0% 0% 0%
Hybrid 0% 0% 0%
Hydrogen 0% 0% 0%

This golf facility has established the following schemes to encourage reductions in staff and customer transport emissions:

Activity Description
Car sharing incentives N/A. Staff are encouraged to get involved in car sharing, but there is not club incentive to do this.
Group transportation (e.g. buses) The club has group transportation services as a part of its transport policy, due to
lack of Public transport nearby. For example, the club runs a shuttle mini bus service
for members, guests and staff.
Secure cycle parking Secure cycle parking is available for all on site, located behind closed doors near the cellar.
Promoting public transport routes and timetables There is no direct public transport to the site, therefore the club offers a transport
service for customers and staff, the course promotes guests to use the train into Sandwich from where shuttle mini bus service has a collection scheme.
Increasing equipment storage (e.g. lockers) The club offers storage for all members. Staff are allocated areas to store
possessions safely during and out of work hours to reduce the volume of work
related items transported. Golf bag storage in the Lodge rooms for guests.
Staff showers Showers are available to staff, and if required are accessible. Showers are there
as part of our Health and Safety policy, with 3 showers available for staff use.
Tax breaking incentives for cycling Staff are encouraged to cycle, and some members of staff are taking advantage of the
scheme.
Promotion of walk to work campaigns Staff are encouraged to walk to work where possible, the course is however isolated, therefore there is a estimated 3 mile walk from the nearest public transport route.

Supply Chain

On average Prince's Golf Club attracts roughly 18,000 golfers a year to Sandwich, bringing in revenue to the local towns. The club and hotel promotes and sources local produce wherever possible, to ensure that the local community supported financially. For example, where applicable local food products are purchased from nearby farms and/or local wholesalers, reducing the number of food miles.

Purchasing Policies

This golf facility undertakes the following ethical / environmental purchasing activities:

Activity Description
Measures to avoid waste at source Purchases of materials on and off the course, are based upon revision annual usage forecasts, avoiding waste wherever possible. Where possible we source and use locally gained products.
Use of local suppliers The course uses local suppliers as a matter of course for all purchasing, as a part of the course ethos to support the local economy, employment and maintain local relationships.
Use of local products It is the course policy to source all our products from local suppliers wherever possible. This includes food and beverage products.
Selection of certified products The golf course where possible supports the production of organic and un-sprayed
products as food consumables, where possible. With regards to fertilisers the club uses on the course, fertiliser from a certified supplier, is used as part of the golf course regime.
Use of recycled and recyclable products The course promotes and consciously purchases, where possible recyclable products,
both on and off playing areas.
Selection of products that feature minimal packaging Perishable items such as bread, fruit and vegetables are sourced locally, where possible, reducing unnecessary packaging. Non-perishable items are bought in bulk according to annual usage forecasts and/or on an as needed basis.
Use of accredited suppliers (e.g. ISO 14001) The course using accredited suppliers, of which suppliers that are associated with the
course maintenance are organisations that are committed to reducing their
environmental impact.

Supply Chain

An overview of the supplier network at this golf facility:

Total number of suppliers Total number of suppliers within 10 Miles Total number of suppliers within 100 Miles
Food & Beverage 12 9 3
Catering Supplies 6 6
Retail 8 6
Trade & Contractors 14 4 10
Maintenance Equipment 3 3
Course Supplies 5 5

Turfgrass Inputs

This golf facility undertakes the following IPM activities:

Activity Description
Encouraging drought and disease tolerant grasses Fertiliser inputs are minimal to encourage finer native grasses. Over seeding with fescue to maximise drought and disease tolerance, native red fescue is encouraged, and naturally the desiccant resistant species. Significant amounts of sand top dressing to improve soil structure and dilute thatch layers.
Managing stress and wear The main thoroughfares to access the course are established and maintained
throughout the year, to reduce wear of the thoroughfares, additional access routes are available and managed on a rotational basis. Frequent aeration is undertaken to all playing surfaces to decrease compaction and wear and stress.
Enhancement of soil structure The course resides within an SSSI area, therefore management actively focuses upon impoverishing the soil structure. It is done by reduced watering, spiking and top dressing with sand, to increase porosity and enhance the soil structure to encourage desirable native species.
Optimization of the growing environment The course watering regime and management targets native diverse flora, by
reducing nutrient inputs, increasing drainage and reducing moisture levels.
Managing thatch levels The thatch levels are managed by hollow coring and top dressing, the use of the grading machine is used to remove material where needed. The course is interested in adopting a bi-annual burning regime in place as part of the winter management which aims to reduce the amount of thatch within this semi-rough and
natural areas out of play.
Managing surface moisture Surface moisture regulated using hand probes visual observation, based upon the
accumulation of weather data, meteorological conditions and seasonal variability.
Establishing thresholds for pests and disease Pests and diseases across the site are recorded daily and dealt with accordingly.
Observation of possible trends in pest and disease establishment is continually monitored. Problem areas are managed in a localised targeted way with minimal pesticide use.
Scouting for pests and diseases Visual observation is undertaken on a daily basis for pests and diseases, and dealt
with accordingly based upon best practices.
Monitoring / improvement of plant health Daily visual observation is undertaken frequently. Our agronomy plan with the Sports Turf Research Institute monitors plant health and improvement 4 times a year.

Fertilizer use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2014 2013 2012
Fairways - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - K - Organic 0 0 50
Fairways - N - Inorganic 15 25 0
Fairways - N - Organic 0 0 35
Fairways - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Fairways - P - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - K - Inorganic 30 40 60
Greens - K - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - N - Inorganic 70 80 120
Greens - N - Organic 0 0 0
Greens - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Greens - P - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - K - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - N - Organic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - P - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - K - Inorganic 30 30 30
Tees - K - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - N - Inorganic 40 40 40
Tees - N - Organic 0 0 0
Tees - P - Inorganic 0 0 0
Tees - P - Organic 0 0 0

Pesticide use at this golf facility in the last three years (kg):

2014 2013 2012
Fairways - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Fairways - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Fairways - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 4 4 4
Fairways - Herbicide - Total Weight 160 160 160
Fairways - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Fairways - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 1 1 1
Fairways - Insecticide - Total Weight 30 30 30
Fairways - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Greens - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 1 3 1
Greens - Fungicide - Total Weight 40 18 40
Greens - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 1 2 1
Greens - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 3 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Total Weight 2 0 0
Greens - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 0 0
Greens - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 1 1 1
Greens - Insecticide - Total Weight 7.5 7.5 7.5
Greens - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Semi-Rough - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Active Ingredient 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Total Weight 0 0 0
Tees - Fungicide - Number of applications per year 0 0 0
Tees - Herbicide - Active Ingredient 4 4 4
Tees - Herbicide - Total Weight 16 16 16
Tees - Herbicide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1
Tees - Insecticide - Active Ingredient 1 1 1
Tees - Insecticide - Total Weight 3 3 3
Tees - Insecticide - Number of applications per year 1 1 1

This golf facility undertakes the following actions to optimize pesticide use:

Activity Description
Selection on the least toxic and lest persistent products Limited use of of pesticides as a reactive, rather than preventative method. All products used on site conform regulations and are approved by the STRI.
Selection of appropriate products for specific pests and diseases Rescue (Selective Herbicide - Rye and Yorkshire fog grasses)

Chipco (Fungicide) Instrata (Fungicide)
Cyren (Insecticide - Leather jackets)
Glyphosate (Non-selective Herbicide - Creeping thistle)
Spot-treatment with handheld sprayers and wipers Spot treatment/weed wiping using Glyphosate on an as needed infrequent application of troublesome perennial weeds.
Calibration and testing of sprayers Calibration and testing of sprayers undertaken as a pre-check before use the sprayer, in addition to intermittent observations during application. Annual pressure test and maintenance.
Use of shrouded sprayer and anti-drip nozzles The use of a shrouded spray boom curtain, is used as standard, to avoid
over-spray/drift and contamination of water source or sand dune aquifer.
Non-chemical weed control Hand weeding is encouraged over chemical control where possible. For example, hand weed ragwort and greens on a continual basis.
Use of organic and biological products to improve plant health and resistance. The use of organic seaweed derivatives (porthcawl) on the course in place of inorganic fertilisers, where possible, to improve plant health and disease resistance.

Waste Management

No waste audits have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility manages key waste streams as follows:

Re-use Recycle Landfill Incinerate
Glass false true false false
Plastic false true false false
Aluminium false true false false
Metal false true false false
Paper & Cardboard false true false false
Grass Clippings false true false false
Cores & Turf true true false false
Sand true true false false
Wood / Timber true true false true

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to continue the lifecycle of materials and resources:

Activity Description
Separation of recyclable materials Separation of club hose and hotel recyclable materials is undertaken according to local government stipulations, with minimal separation addressed on-site. On the course a variety of materials such as organic material from the compost heap, is recycled as back fill and top dressing on areas of play.
Establishment of recycling centers The course has various areas for recycling at both the clubhouse and green keeping sheds.
Many years ago a large investment was made by building a reservoir to allow us to store water allowing us to abstract from a local source when the environment agency allows us to.
At all the sinks both Lodge and Clubhouse which use a lot of water such as kitchen sinks we have installed BIo packs to treat the water before with is sent to our treatment system.
We installed at The Lodge a waste water management system to collect and treat all waste water which is then pumped to our reservoir for the course.
Returning clipping to fairways and walkways Due to the ecological importance of the dune system which the golf course resides, all plant material is removed to a allocated composting area. No organic material is
returned unscreened, in accordance to international guidelines for an area sensitive to nutrients.
Education of staff and customer education Research led environmental awareness is promoted to relevant members of staff, and staff are encouraged to communicate this knowledge where appropriate. The club communicates to its staff and customers via memos and newsletters staff and customers.
Waste awareness campaigns It is responsibility of management to ensure that all members of staff are aware of the
golf clubs waste awareness campaign. Members of staff are also encouraged to
engage and contribute ideas when possible.

Pollution Control

Chemicals are stored in secured metal cabinets, with installed bunded areas to ensure that any leakages are contained. Chemicals are only purchased in accordance to the guidance operation of the spray equipment to ensure that no unnecessary excess chemical volume is present at anyone time. Fertilisers comprise of nitrogen inorganic soluble compounds, and seaweed derivative plant feed solutions, purchased on an as needed basis to reduce storage on-site and safeguard against potential possible contamination to the groundwater.

Chemical access is restricted to only appointed qualified individuals, whom have understood the chemical safety guidelines, PA 1, 2 and 6. Equipment is washed down with grey water within a purpose-built bunded area, with a water recycling facility attached. All members of staff are trained to recognise and avoid potential the leachates of nutrients or other potentially harmful chemicals to the environment. Ensuring that any chemical residue from the spray booms, is protected by the installation of buffer zones to avoid potential chemical dispersal into ditches and waterways.

The course aims to protect the quality of the local environment by reducing applications of chemicals and fertilisers, as much as possible. The goal is to become pesticide and fungicide free by improving our soil structure and grass composition to become as disease and pest resistant as possible. Recycling of our waste water from our wash down area also ensures we will not pollute the local water bodies.

Water Analysis

This golf facility monitors water quality with the following frequency:

Chemical Biological Visual
Inflow Yearly Yearly Monthly
On-Site Yearly Yearly Monthly
Outflow Never Never Monthly

Waste Water

Waste water from this golf facility is managed as follows:

Discharges to Formal Discharge Agreement
Golf Course Ditch No
Clubhouse On-Site Treatment Plant N/A
Maintenance Facility Mains Sewer No
Wash Pad Closed Loop Recycling N/A

Hazardous Materials

Hazardous materials at this golf facility are handled and disposed of as follows:

Secure Storage Registered Uplift
Detergents true false
Cooking Oils true true
Lubricants true true
Pesticide Containers true true
Fertiliser Bags true true
Oil Filters true true
Batteries true true

Pollution Prevention

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution from its maintenance facility and clubhouse:

Activity Description
Storage of equipment and hazardous products on covered, sealed impervious areas Equipment facility is located on a non-porous hard-standing with chemical
resistant painted floor, to reduce any possible contamination of leachates to the
groundwater. Chemicals and fertilisers are stored within a secure appropriate chemsafe container. Absorbent materials are kept to deal with leaks or spills.
Maintenance of equipment on covered, sealed impervious areas All maintenance of machinery takes place within the equipment facility which has
a non-porous hard-standing with chemical resistant painted floor, appropriate
absorbent materials are always nearby to deal with any potential leaks or spills
from vehicle maintenance.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers in covered areas Mixing of chemicals and fertilizers takes place within a designated water recycling pad. Spray booms are always inspected by PA 1,2 and 6 qualified personnel before being allowed to venture out of the compound.
Mixing of pesticides and fertilizers over impervious surfaces Mixing of chemicals and fertilizers takes place within the purpose-built bunded
compound, with a non-porous hard-standing. Spray booms are always inspected
by PA 1,2 and 6 qualified personnel before being allowed to venture out of the
compound.
Installation of above-ground fuel tanks Fuel oils are stored above ground in a double skinned bunded tank suitable for
the contained liquid.
Installation of sufficient secondary containment for fuel Fuel oil is within a double skinned tank on a hard standing. Fuel oil access is securely locked at all times, even between dispensing. This ensures that appropriate use is restricted to only those personnel which should have access, thus ensuring fuel containment.
Provision of containment booms and absorbent materials The fuel oil tank is inspected on a daily basis to ensure that there is no visible
leaks. A spill kit is located near the fuel tank, to ensure minimum contamination of spilt fuel.

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to prevent pollution on its golf course:

Activity Description
Eliminating leachate and run-off through careful timing of turf inputs Applications of fertilisers and herbicides/pesticides are planned in accordance to the golf course management schedule. Applications of chemicals and fertilisers, are
reviewed on a as needed basis and only applied during optimal conditions, i.e. avoid heavy rainfall, in accordance to spraying guidelines.
Establishment of vegetative buffer strips around water bodies Vegetation is encouraged to establish around water bodies and ditches, to act as a
sterile strip to reduce potential contamination into the watercourses either from
over-spray during windy conditions, or as a capture/containment barrier between
organic material entering the watercourses. Additionally chemical applications are not made within 5 metres distance from water bodies.
Establishment of emergency spillage response plan Contain and reduce potential chemical contamination in to the aquifer/water table, move sprayer to hard (non-porous) standing, pump/transfer chemicals to suitable container. Move damaged sprayer to bunded wash area at shed, to be repaired. Chemical spill kits in shed areas. Staff are trained in emergency spill kit protocols.
Controlling erosion and sediment discharge The golf course resides within a stabilised dune system, therefore potential erosion
is limited to the tips of the higher dunes, where there can be a small element of
sediment loss via wind desiccation.
Establishment of pesticide-free zones Pesticide usage is kept to a minimum, and preventive treatments in known problem areas. Pesticides are only applied to playing surfaces when needed. All unmanaged rough areas are pesticide free zones.
Use of swales and bio-filters to slow and treat surface run-off Vegetation is encouraged to establish around watercourses and ditches, acting as
an element of catchment to reduce the flow/volume of surface run-off. The course
has a management regime of promoting porosity and free drainage throughout the
dune system, therefore excess surface run-off is limited.

Community

The club provides jobs and services for many local companies and individuals. The club supports businesses which provide us with produce and they intern send us clients and members. The club also supports local charities with auction items and our members have there own local charities which the club actively supports.

Employment & Education

Typical staffing levels at this golf facility are:

Full Time Part Time Seasonal
Club Management 2
Course Management 8 8
Food & Beverage 3
Golf Coaching 3 1
Retail & Leisure 3 1
Caddies 4 4

The sustainability working group at this golf facility is comprised of:

  • General Manager
  • Course Manager
  • Technical Specialist
  • Local Environment NGO

Employees at this golf facility receive the following formal and informal environmental education:

Activity Description
Storage, application and disposal of pesticides The golf club has training links East Kent Training, which trains and validates green keeping staff to PA 1, 2 and 6 spray certification. Facilities are also inspected at regular intervals. Used pesticide containers are collected by registered uplift contractor, twice a year.
Efficient water management The course has a water management regime and collection procedure that recycles grey and brown water for use on and off the areas of play. Machinery is wash down in a bunded area and recycled for additional cleaning operations. Irrigation water is used minimally to ensure no wastage occurs.
Management of accidents and emergencies There are numerous trained first aiders on and off the course, whom are briefed in the course accident and emergency procedures. there are also 10 advanced trained Defib first responders.
Management of habitats and vegetation The course management employs a policy of minimal disturbance to sensitive habitats outside of play, in accordance with the guidelines stated for SSSI areas under management, and inspected periodically by a representative from Natural England.
Waste minimization, separation and recycling Wherever possible the club house waste is separated and recycled. 100% of organic
waste from the course is recycled at a designated composting area. All other material
used in the green keeping management are recycled and reused, where possible.
Health & Safety The course has health and safety representatives for the club social areas and a separate appointed health and safety rep for the green staff and areas in play. Health and safety procedures are review annually.
Energy Saving All line management have a responsibility to promote energy saving and education of
staff. Opportunities exist in future to exploit alternative energy sources.
Understanding of landscape and cultural heritage The course resides within a sensitive area, SSSI and has numerous other environmental designations nearby. Communication is encouraged between members and staff to promote understanding of the ecological sensitivity of the landscape.
Environmental management planning Environmental management planning is the responsibility of the management team, working with the Course Manager. Research informed management from CCCU and Natural England aids real time course level environmental management.

Community Relations

This golf facility engages with local community groups in the following manner:

Activity Description
Neighbours The Club engages positively with all our neighbours. The course is close to the bird observatory which we allow access to the facility for them to monitor wildlife. The shoreline is managed by Kent Wildlife Trust and Natural England. Princes also works closely with RSGGC. We have also been involved with golf and tourism initiatives with our neighbours in France and Belgium with Visit Kent
Local Government We work with the local and county tourist boards, being a founder of the Visit Kent initiative to promote golf and tourism to Kent after the 2011 Open Championships. We promote on our website links to various tourist attractions. We did win a Kent County award for the contribution we made to tourism and employment in the area.
We are working closely with local and national government with the Coastal Access pilot scheme. Whilst we have many objections we are trying to promote alternative suggestions that would make the impact on the area less intrusive.
Local Environmental Groups The club actively communicates with Natural England (Phil Williams) and CCCU (Graham Earl) with regard to species on the site. The club supports and allows access to the Sandwich Bay Observatory and Kent Wildlife Trust, both of whom we have a good working relationship.
Local Community Groups The club hosts the Sandwich Rotary at Prince's, and our professionals teach children from local schools. Links with Canterbury Christ Church University, particularly encouraging research on the course encourages student involvement in the course. We have also supported a local hospice charity
Media We work closely with many media outlets from Golf magazines to local newspapers. We advertise all of the clubs facilities through local and nation media. in addition we have internally trained two members of staff for our social media output. We host many national and international journalists who not only write about our facilities but that of our competitors, promoting Kent as a destination to visit. We have featured in many

Local Businesses The Club's purchasing strategy tries to support local businesses, wherever possible.
Schools & Colleges The club is actively involved in a number of educational facilities, offering work experience posts to local schools when requested. The club also has links to educational institutions, such as Canterbury Christ Church University, Thanet College food (catering students/staff), Plumton College (greens apprentice/staff).

Land Use & Cultural Heritage

This golf facility provides access and diversified land use for others through:

Activity Description
Maintenance of existing public paths The club has two public footpaths across the facility. One of these is maintained as it is used by the green keepers. The other runs alongside the facility and not under our maintenance plan.
Creation of new paths and nature trails Due to health and safety regulations, and safe guarding of the public, the club is not looking to introduce additional permissive paths through areas of play.
Installation of effective and welcoming signage The signing on site is discrete yet effective and meets all Health and Safety
demands. The Club is private property and there is no access to non-golfers
other than on the public footpaths.
Providing opportunities for other recreation (e.g. fishing) N/A
Partnership conservation and access projects (e.g. community woodland) Sandwich Bird Observatory is allowed access to monitor habitats for marked-capture-release surveys. Nearby RAMSAR designation and large areas of dune grasses allows for observation of migrating birds.
Continuation of traditional agricultural activities As a part of past course management, the club is looking to reintroduce short rotation low stocking rough grazing by sheep.

No archaeological or heritage surveys have been undertaken at this golf facility.

This golf facility does not consult any organizations regarding the conservation of cultural heritage.

This golf facility undertakes the following activities to conserve cultural heritage features:

Activity Description
Buildings (Listed Buildings / Ancient Monuments etc) There are no listed buildings or monuments on site.
Archaeology (Settlements / Agricultural System etc) There are no archaeological artefacts on site.
Historic Features (Hedgerows / Dykes / Moats / Cairns etc) There are established boundary hedgerows on site, which are >50 years. Ditch systems have been established for a greater length of time.

Communications

This golf facility undertakes the following internal environmental communications:

Activity Description
Provision of newsletters, notice boards & poster display Members receive approximately 10 newsletters a year, on which course general course updates are reported, in addition to conservation and environmental issues/findings.
Members evenings and course walks The club hosts members evenings, but not course walks for the members or public. Staff are encouraged to engage with members and public to expand on the course progression, when asked. The course manager does write a course update for the members.
Course guides / brochures None other than Strokesaver. 100 year centenary brochure
Interpretation panels & course signage Minimal course signage, but no interpretation panels on site.
Establishment of a nature trail Due to Health and Safety regulations, the club is apprehensive to establish a new nature trail, outside of the established foot paths.

This golf facility undertakes the following social and environmental advocacy activities:

Activity Description
Website, press releases & brochures We are just finalising our new website which will lead to an email brochure and have an app making us less paper orientated. We have numerous press releases every year and we host many journalist and other organisations
Supporting campaigns We allow various conservation bodies on to the course to carry out surveys/studies. We have nesting boxes on our buildings for endangered species such as hawks/ owls.
Attending community meetings We attend the environment agency talks regards water consumption. We allow various surveys from outside bodies, nature / bird observatories/ moth studies. we support Visit Kent to encourage tourism to the area
Joint practical projects with community We work with many schools and support many local and regional charities. Our Professionals undertake a great deal of coaching with local schools